palm wine

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Related to Palm-wine: Palm toddy, Palm-wine music, Thadi Kallu

palm wine

n
(Brewing) (esp in W Africa) the sap drawn from the palm tree, esp when allowed to ferment
References in periodicals archive ?
This characteristic obtains from Amos Tutuola's The Palm-wine Drinkard (1952) to Tope Folarin's Caine Prize winner short story "Miracle" (2013).
127), including the effects of Indic, Islamic, and Christian missionization; the oeuvre of a Toba songwriter, Nahum Situmorang; participatory musicking at palm-wine bars; choral hymn-singing in Christian churches; funeral laments; and professional music-making by Batak musicians in Jakarta.
It was the day on which her suitor (having already paid the greater part of her bride-price) would bring palm-wine not only to her parents and immediate relatives but to the wide and extensive group of kinsmen called umunna.
Okonkwo keeps the images of his personal god, the images of his ancestors and worships them with sacrifices of cola nuts, palm-wine and food.
He is told by one friend that he cannot become a writer, as he has no story similar to that of The Old Man and the Sea, Love in the Time of Cholera, The Tin Drum, or even The Palm-Wine Drinkard--plots invoked in the prologue--and, besides, Africans did not invent the ballpoint pen.
His father encouraged him to take up music but as soon as the young Uwaifo began spending his time in palm-wine bars playing the guitar he had saved up his money to buy, his father had second thoughts and even, at one point, threatened to destroy the instrument.
The second part discusses the structure of Amos Tutuola's book, The Palm-Wine Drinkard and the problems of translating it into German.
Some will also compare the novel's language to Amos Tutuola's The Palm-Wine Drinkard and My Life in the Bush of Ghosts (Grove Press, 1994), which is written in broken English.
A former palm-wine tapper now aged 90, Sang Jatta studied the palm of my hand, promised good things and predicted my return to The Gambia.
He is hounded out of the village and camps at the outskirts from where he descends periodically to the village to steal roof-matting and his father's palm-wine.
Amos Tutuola's The Palm-Wine Drinkard constantly appears to its critics as the most locally produced work of an immature artist which cannot transcend the boundary of its literary provincialism.
Echin Jatta is a palm-wine tapper and guardian of the Big Forest -- keeping out poachers and wood thieves.