palm wine

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palm wine

n
(Brewing) (esp in W Africa) the sap drawn from the palm tree, esp when allowed to ferment
References in periodicals archive ?
After several pleas, he said the only thing that would make him to accept me was if I could be a palmwine tapper to raise money and go back to Lagos.
Amos Tutuola was another "African writer" who was despised by the English Lit establishment, the derision--and patronising--inflected on him by those better "educated" than him could squelch the creative impulse, The Palmwine Drinkard would have been his last offering at the literary shrine.
In spite of this initial efforts, Nigerian literature in English would only gain serious international recognition upon the publication of Amos Tutuola's Palmwine Drinkard in 1952.
Raphia palmwine is the sap of a monocarp crop and is widely grown along the cost of west and central Africa (Ekanem, 1959, Bassier, 1968), palmwine is an important socio-economic, nutrition and health item of many Nigerians especially the low-income rural dwellers.
The protagonists in novels like Amos Tutuola's The Palmwine Drinkerd, Chinua Achebe's Things Fall Apart and Arrow of God are men.
Another marriage, ending after the palmwine was spilled and not spilled.
Apart from the main Enyigba lode, others are Ameri, Ameka, Ikwo, Palmwine, Nine pence and Portuguese lodes [3].
I poured palmwine and gave [it to] Kofi)--although this is not transparent from Heine and Reh's hierarchical structure in (26a).
The final section of Euba's essay presents musical-textual analyses of "The Palmwine Drinkard" by Ogunmola in the neo-African church style; "Oba Ko So" by Duro Ladipo, a "native air opera"; and Euba's folk opera, "Obaluaye.
The other type was the 'bush' guitar bands that had their roots in old palmwine music of outfits such as E K Nyame, Yamoah, Kakaiku, the Jaguar Jokers and Oyina--all of whom began as acoustic artists (often attached to travelling theatrical groups), but later switched to electric instruments.
With the dead of the Drinkard's tapster, he finds his own existence very hard because he cannot do without palmwine and cannot find a substitute.
If you never offer your uncle palmwine, you'll not learn many proverbs," prompts a Ghanaian saying.