pancreatic cancer

(redirected from Pancreatic neoplasms)
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Related to Pancreatic neoplasms: Pancreatic carcinoma, Pancreatic malignancy

pancreatic cancer

The presence of a malignant tumor in the pancreas. Smoking and a diet high in fats or alcohol may contribute to the disease.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.pancreatic cancer - cancer of the pancreas
carcinoma - any malignant tumor derived from epithelial tissue; one of the four major types of cancer
References in periodicals archive ?
4-6 Pancreatic NETs comprise 1-2% of all pancreatic neoplasms with incidence of 1 in 100,000 persons.
Intraductal papillary-mucinous tumours represent a distinct group of pancreatic neoplasms; an investigation of tumour cell differentiation and K-ras, p53 and c-erbB-2 abnormalities in 26 patients.
Occasionally, a cystic growth pattern or cystic degeneration can develop in typically solid pancreatic neoplasms, such as pancreatic adenocarcinoma, solid-pseudopapillary neoplasm, or neuroendocrine tumor.
Pancreatic neuroendocrine tumors (NETs) represent approximately 1-5% of pancreatic neoplasms. (1) Most occur sporadically, but approximately 1% to 2% are associated with familial syndromes.
Pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma (PDA) accounts for 90% of all pancreatic neoplasms and is the fourth leading cause of cancer-related death in the western world (1).
Diener, "Meta-analysis of surgical outcome after enucleation versus standard resection for pancreatic neoplasms," British Journal of Surgery, vol.
Daniel et al., "Cystic pancreatic neoplasms: observe or operate," Annals of Surgery, vol.
Pederzoli, "Enucleation of pancreatic neoplasms," British Journal of Surgery, vol.
Monahan, "EUS-guided FNA for diagnosis ofsolid pancreatic neoplasms: a meta-analysis," Gastrointestinal Endoscopy, vol.
In conclusion, although pancreatic metastases from squamous cell carcinoma of the lung are unusual, differentiation from primary pancreatic neoplasms is important.
Pancreatic acinar cell carcinoma (PACC) is a rare tumor that accounts for approximately 1% of malignant pancreatic neoplasms [1].