panic buying

(redirected from Panic-buying)
Also found in: Financial.

panic buying

n
the buying up of large quantities of a commodity which, it is feared, is likely to be in short supply
Translations

panic buying

[ˈpænɪkˈbaɪɪŋ] naccaparramento (di generi alimentari)
Mentioned in ?
References in periodicals archive ?
Shelves in supermarkets were left empty because of panic-buying.
IF Radamel Falcao smacked of last-minute panic-buying, then the same has to be said of Arsenal's consequential purchase of Danny Welbeck (right).
AS children's author Michael Bond explains in his introduction to this new collection, he stumbled across the inspiration for his most famous creation when he was panic-buying one Christmas Eve.
EVENTS 1956: Panic-buying breaks out at garages across the country as the government gives details of its petrol rationing plans.
I would like to advise the public not to believe in such a speculation and to stop spreading the rumours because panic-buying will only cause problems.
New York City Mayor Michael Bloomberg has urged people not to succumb to panic-buying and assured there is enough supply.
Mr Cameron accused the Labour leader of "complete weakness" for failing to stand up to Unite, while Mr Miliband called on the PM and Cabinet Office minister Francis Maude to apologise for provoking panic-buying at the pumps when the prospect of a strike was first raised.
When the dispute was in the news last month there was panic-buying of fuel and shortages of supplies after the Government advised motorists to top up their cars with petrol and one minister suggested storing fuel in jerry cans.
Panic-buying in recent days has led to frenzied scenes around the country as forecourt queues spilled out on to nearby roads.
They say "Self-inflicted insanity" - The Petroleum Industry Association's description of panic-buying by motorists over the threat of a tanker drivers' strike.
PETROL stations were running dry last night as panic-buying continued despite Easter strike action by tanker drivers being ruled out.
The explosion of panic-buying increased pressure on the Government after Cabinet Office Minister Francis Maude's now infamous comments telling motorists to have "a bit of extra fuel in a jerry can in the garage".