pantisocracy


Also found in: Wikipedia.

pantisocracy

(ˌpæntɪˈsɒkrəsɪ)
n
(Government, Politics & Diplomacy) a community, social group, etc, in which all have rule and everyone is equal
[C18 (coined by Robert Southey): from Greek, from panto- + isos equal + -cracy]

pantisocracy

a utopian community where all are equal and all rule. — pantisocratist, n.pantisocratic, pantisocratical, adj.
See also: Government
References in classic literature ?
With some others of like mind they formed a little society, which they called the Pantisocracy, from Greek words meaning all-equal- rule.
Wright supports these claims by invoking the orthodox Anglican views of Coleridge's father, and by reading Coleridge's letters written around the time of the lectures as evidence of the depth of his commitment to pantisocracy.
In tracing Coleridge's development from his radical Pantisocracy days of the early and mid-1790s to his solidly Trinitarian, Anglican work of the 1820s, Wright shows that biblical authority was always at the core of Coleridge's thought.
The doom that Kubla's pleasure-dome may soon face reminds us of Coleridge's own plan for his failed Pantisocracy in 1794--a plan partly prompted by the disillusionment of the French Revolution as well as the contemporary evil political system in his own country.
And fain would take thee with me, in the Dell / Where high-soul'd Pantisocracy shall dwell
Portraying Southey's own heavenly apotheosis as Poet Laureate, Byron exclaims: "For pantisocracy he once had cried,/ Then grew a hearty anti-Jacobin.
Notably, there is the way 'Madoc--A Mystery' tells the story of an alternative Pantisocracy as if it is also the story of contemporary Northern Ireland, or contemporary Northern Irish poetry and its critics; and the way 'The Bangle (Slight Return)' appears to tell three stories at the same time, privileging none in a poem partly about privilege.
Unable to lift their ideal society from the pages of their notebooks, Pantisocracy crumbled.
Now reissued in paper,(1) it sees Coleridge through the first half of his life, a period whose highlights include his harebrained utopian scheme called Pantisocracy, his flirtation with Jacobin journalism, his Wanderjahr in Germany, and the most fruitful period of his friendship and collaboration with Wordsworth.
Driven by specific personal and philosophical factors, rather than a generalized formal or psychical instability, the revision of "This Lime-Tree Bower My Prison" both shows and tells Southey about pantisocracy regained.
Coleridge's passionate belief, through Southey's enthusiasm, in pantisocracy (a community where all are equal and all rule; with consensus, which Godwin advocated for its inclusiveness) inspired him to contemplate writing the Book of Pantisocracy.
Coleridge and Robert Southey, who was later to become Poet Laureate, proposed to create a pantisocracy, or utopian community in which all would rule equally, in these woodlands on the banks of the Susquehanna.