pantisocrat

pantisocrat

(pænˈtɪsəˌkræt) or

pantisocratist

n
someone who believes, or takes part, in pantisocracy
References in periodicals archive ?
Many of their works--such as Sophia Lee's Almeyda, Queen of Granada (1796), a tragedy set in Moorish Spain, Coleridge's fellow pantisocrat Southey's Letters Written during a Short Residence in Spain and Portugal (1797), which was a result of his visit to those countries immediately following the failure of their jointly planned Pantisocracy, and Landor's oriental Gebir (1798), which was an attack on the Spanish prince Gebir's invasion and colonization of Egypt--came about the same time as Kubla Khan was being written.
Coleridge's "error in judgment" in marrying Sarah "will always remain a mystery," writes Taylor (21), before going on to cite Coleridge's letter to Southey written in December 1794 from London, where the rash Pantisocrat was for all intents and purposes hiding out: "to marry a woman whom I do not love--to degrade her, whom I call my Wife, by making her the Instrument of low desire.
Her concurrence in Albert's revolutionary understanding of the institutions of Spanish Catholicism, her belief (like his) that revenge is a poor solution to oppression, mirrors the oneness of heart Coleridge had felt with Mary Ann Evans and the earnestness with which he urged amelioration of mind and heart on the female pantisocrats.
Welsh Indians, British Pantisocrats, and an Irish Poet', in Eckstein, Lars, & Reinfandt, Christoph, eds.
Stung by the criticism, Southey provoked an argument with Coleridge, and their angry public tirade prompted onlookers to remark wryly that the two Pantisocrats, who had vowed "to subdue all anti-social passions by the exercise of reason," had almost come to blows
Burnett's physical silencing is indicative of 'Madoc' as a whole: although the surtitles alluding to philosophers imply an overarching narrative, every impulse towards formal coherence is disturbed by filth and bodily invasion, and the utopian quest of the Pantisocrats is haunted by its ineradicable supplement, abjection.