pantisocratic


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pantisocratic

(ˌpæntɪsəʊˈkrætɪk) or

pantisocratical

adj
relating to pantisocracy
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63) Coleridge would have known something of this equivocal strategy from personal experience: self-doubt, assertions of expertise, and attempts to achieve rhetorical victories were prominent in Coleridge's relations with Robert Southey and (besides the financial worries) dragged down their pantisocratic aspirations.
The relations of Madoc with the Black Legend (Anacaona appears prominently in Las Casas' Short Account of the Destruction of the Indies), Coleridge and Southey's own Pantisocratic plans m emigrate to the Susquehanna, and earlier epicized encounters with the New World, such as Cowley's De Plantis, are beyond the scope of this article.
A book-length poem that imagines how Robert Southey and Samuel Taylor Coleridge's plan to establish a Pantisocratic society in Pennsylvania might have unfolded, Madoc allows readers to observe how Muldoon himself reads his Lewis and Clark, Southey and Coleridge precursor texts and, equally important to postmodern concepts of intertextuality, the relations between those intertexts and the contemporaneous discursive and cultural field of which they are a part.
To understand one of Coleridge's motives in publishing The Friend years later--to vindicate his youthful enthusiasms--it is necessary to see the poet's Pantisocratic aspirations and his sympathy for the Revolution as two sides of the same coin.
In his alternative nineteenth century, Coleridge and Southey do actually found the Pantisocratic community on the Susquehanna that, in the real nineteenth century, they had only daydreamed about.
This cause, according to Coleridge's momentous letter, is the aborted pantisocratic venture.