dame

(redirected from Pantomime dame)
Also found in: Thesaurus, Encyclopedia, Wikipedia.

dame

 (dām)
n.
1. Used formerly as a courtesy title for a woman in authority or a mistress of a household.
2.
a. A married woman; a matron.
b. An elderly woman.
3. Often Offensive Slang A woman.
4. Chiefly British
a. A woman holding a nonhereditary title conferred by a sovereign in recognition of personal merit or service to the country.
b. The wife or widow of a knight.
c. Used as the title for such a woman.

[Middle English, from Old French, from Latin domina, feminine of dominus, lord, master; see dem- in Indo-European roots.]

dame

(deɪm)
n
1. (Sociology) (formerly) a woman of rank or dignity; lady
2. (Ecclesiastical Terms) a nun who has taken the vows of her order, esp a Benedictine
3. archaic chiefly Brit a matronly or elderly woman
4. slang chiefly US and Canadian a woman
5. (Theatre) Also called: pantomime dame Brit the role of a comic old woman in a pantomime, usually played by a man
[C13: from Old French, from Latin domina lady, mistress of a household]

Dame

(in Britain) n
1. (Sociology) the title of a woman who has been awarded the Order of the British Empire or any of certain other orders of chivalry
2. (Sociology) the legal title of the wife or widow of a knight or baronet, placed before her name: Dame Judith. Compare Lady

dame

(deɪm)

n.
1. (cap.) (in Britain)
a. the official title of a female member of the Order of the British Empire, equivalent to that of a knight.
b. the official title of the wife of a knight or baronet.
2. (formerly) a form of address to any woman of rank or authority.
3. a matronly woman of advanced age; matron.
4. Slang: Sometimes Offensive. a woman; female.
5. Archaic. the mistress of a household.
6. Archaic. a woman of rank or authority, esp. a female ruler.
[1175–1225; Middle English < Old French < Latin domina, feminine of dominus lord, master]
usage: Definition 4 is sometimes perceived as insulting. The context in which the word is used will usually clarify the intent of the speaker.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.dame - informal terms for a (young) womandame - informal terms for a (young) woman  
fille, girl, miss, missy, young lady, young woman - a young woman; "a young lady of 18"
2.dame - a woman of refinementdame - a woman of refinement; "a chauffeur opened the door of the limousine for the grand lady"
grande dame - a middle-aged or elderly woman who is stylish and highly respected
madame - title used for a married Frenchwoman
adult female, woman - an adult female person (as opposed to a man); "the woman kept house while the man hunted"

dame

noun
1. lady, baroness, dowager, grande dame (French), noblewoman, peeress a Dame of the British Empire
2. (Slang, chiefly U.S. and Canad.) woman, girl, lady, female, bird (slang), maiden (archaic), miss, chick (slang), maid (archaic), gal (slang), lass, lassie (informal), wench (facetious) This is one classy dame you've got yourself here.
Translations
سَيِّدهسَيِّدَه شَريفَه
dámaženská
damekvinde
damamujertía (informal)
női lovagi rang
hefîarkonakona
bobadamamoteris
dāmakundzītesievišķis
kadınkadın şövalye

dame

[deɪm] N
1. Dame (Brit) (= title) título aristocrático para mujeres equivalente a "sir"
2. (esp Brit) (o.f.) → dama f, señora f (Brit) (Theat) personaje de mujer anciana en las pantomimas británicas interpretado por un actor PANTOMIME
3. (US) (o.f.) (= woman) → tía f, gachí f (Sp)

dame

[ˈdeɪm] n
(US) (= woman) → nana f
(THEATRE) (also pantomime dame) → vieille dame f (rôle comique joué par un homme)

dame

n
Dame (Brit) Titel der weiblichen Träger des „Order of the British Empire“
(= old lady)Dame f; Dame Fortune (esp Brit) → Frau Fortuna f
(Theat, in pantomime) → (komische) Alte
(US inf) → Weib nt (inf)

dame

[deɪm] n (title, also) (Am) (fam) → donna, madama; (in pantomime) personaggio comico di donna attempata recitato da un uomo

dame

(deim) noun
1. (the status of) a lady of the same rank as a knight. There were several dames at the royal wedding.
2. (American) a woman.
References in periodicals archive ?
No stranger to treading the boards, he has regularly appeared as a pantomime dame in local productions but accepted an invitation to take part in the musical which will set sail at Middlesbrough Theatre in April.
THEATRE Mother Goose An evening of love interest, villains and, of course, a pantomime dame as the Burjesta Theatre puts on its first panto since opening with Mother Goose.
The comedian, actor, radio personality, pantomime dame, charity worker and newspaper columnist, to name a few of his roles, had been celebrating his 90th for a whole week by the time his celebrations came to an end at the weekend.
Labour is rapidly becoming a pantomime dame and will never be elected again unless a precise political and economic vision is constructed and communicated to the electorate.
Dave Burn, who played villain El Loco, and Robbie Nixon, the pantomime Dame, were highly commended for their performances, while principal boy Bethany Marshall was nominated for best overall actress.
Angus Lennie as Shughie McFee in Crossroads, with motel chef Carlos, in The Great Escape and with Stanley Baxter as a pantomime dame |
There is Nothing Like a Dame: The History of the Pantomime Dame, BBC Four, Thursday, 9pm| ONE day last January it seemed like business as usual at York's Theatre Royal, except that local legendary dame, Berwick Kaler had a rather unlikely pupil, Michael Grade.
What wobbly little skater from Emmerdale could be as instantly recognisable as pantomime dame Jason?
To which Mr Osborne shot back: "At least I'm not the pantomime dame.
Mr Osborne replied: "At least I'm not the pantomime dame.
It would be nice to see David Moyes shifting uneasily in the dugout in an overly-tight codpiece or a Christopher Biggins-style pantomime dame outfit.
Anyone who Imagines the art of the pantomime dame Is endangered has obviously not seen Hockley, In a range of sculpted technicol-our outfits, bestriding the stage to ad-lib banter with cast and audience members alike.