paradigm

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par·a·digm

 (păr′ə-dīm′, -dĭm′)
n.
1. One that serves as a pattern or model.
2. A set or list of all the inflectional forms of a word or of one of its grammatical categories: the paradigm of an irregular verb.
3. A set of assumptions, concepts, values, and practices that constitutes a way of viewing reality for the community that shares them, especially in an intellectual discipline.

[Middle English, example, from Late Latin paradīgma, from Greek paradeigma, from paradeiknunai, to compare : para-, alongside; see para-1 + deiknunai, to show; see deik- in Indo-European roots.]
Usage Note: Paradigm first appeared in English in the 1400s, meaning "an example or pattern," and it still bears this meaning today: Their company is a paradigm of the small high-tech firms that have recently sprung up in this area. For nearly 400 years paradigm has also been applied to the patterns of inflections that are used to sort the verbs, nouns, and other parts of speech of a language into groups that are more easily studied. Since the 1960s, paradigm has also been used in science to refer to a theoretical framework, as in a new paradigm for understanding diabetes. This usage was acceptable to 91 percent of the Usage Panel in our 2009 survey. Applications of the term in other contexts show that it can sometimes be used more loosely to mean "the prevailing view of things." The Usage Panel also accepts these nonscientific extensions. In 2009, 74 percent accepted the sentence The paradigm governing international competition and competitiveness has shifted dramatically in the last three decades. This represents a dramatic increase over the 48 percent that accepted the same sentence in 1993.
American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, Fifth Edition. Copyright © 2016 by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. All rights reserved.

paradigm

(ˈpærəˌdaɪm)
n
1. (Grammar) grammar the set of all the inflected forms of a word or a systematic arrangement displaying these forms
2. a pattern or model
3. a typical or stereotypical example (esp in the phrase paradigm case)
4. (Philosophy) (in the philosophy of science) a very general conception of the nature of scientific endeavour within which a given enquiry is undertaken
[C15: via French and Latin from Greek paradeigma pattern, from paradeiknunai to compare, from para-1 + deiknunai to show]
paradigmatic, paradigmatical adj
Collins English Dictionary – Complete and Unabridged, 12th Edition 2014 © HarperCollins Publishers 1991, 1994, 1998, 2000, 2003, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2011, 2014

par•a•digm

(ˈpær əˌdaɪm, -dɪm)

n.
1. a set of all the inflected forms of a word based on a single stem or root, as boy, boy's, boys, boys'.
2. an example serving as a model; pattern: a paradigm of virtue.
[1475–85; < Late Latin paradīgma < Greek parádeigma pattern; <paradeiknýnai to show side by side =para- para-1 + deiknýnai to show]
Random House Kernerman Webster's College Dictionary, © 2010 K Dictionaries Ltd. Copyright 2005, 1997, 1991 by Random House, Inc. All rights reserved.

paradigm

1. a declension, conjugation, etc. that provides all the inflectional forms and serves as a model or example for all others.
2. any model or example. — paradigmatic, paradigmatical, adj.
See also: Grammar
-Ologies & -Isms. Copyright 2008 The Gale Group, Inc. All rights reserved.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.paradigm - systematic arrangement of all the inflected forms of a word
inflection, inflexion - a change in the form of a word (usually by adding a suffix) to indicate a change in its grammatical function
2.paradigm - a standard or typical exampleparadigm - a standard or typical example; "he is the prototype of good breeding"; "he provided America with an image of the good father"
example, model - a representative form or pattern; "I profited from his example"
concentrate - a concentrated example of something; "the concentrate of contemporary despair"
imago - (psychoanalysis) an idealized image of someone (usually a parent) formed in childhood
3.paradigm - the class of all items that can be substituted into the same position (or slot) in a grammatical sentence (are in paradigmatic relation with one another)
category, class, family - a collection of things sharing a common attribute; "there are two classes of detergents"
4.paradigm - the generally accepted perspective of a particular discipline at a given time; "he framed the problem within the psychoanalytic paradigm"
perspective, view, position - a way of regarding situations or topics etc.; "consider what follows from the positivist view"
Based on WordNet 3.0, Farlex clipart collection. © 2003-2012 Princeton University, Farlex Inc.

paradigm

noun model, example, original, pattern, ideal, norm, prototype, archetype, exemplar He was the paradigm of the successful man.
Collins Thesaurus of the English Language – Complete and Unabridged 2nd Edition. 2002 © HarperCollins Publishers 1995, 2002

paradigm

noun
One that is worthy of imitation or duplication:
The American Heritage® Roget's Thesaurus. Copyright © 2013, 2014 by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. All rights reserved.
Translations
paradigma
paradigmavzor
maailmankatsomusparadigma
paradygmat
vzor

paradigm

[ˈpærədaɪm]
A. Nparadigma m
B. CPD paradigm shift Ncambio m de paradigma
Collins Spanish Dictionary - Complete and Unabridged 8th Edition 2005 © William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1971, 1988 © HarperCollins Publishers 1992, 1993, 1996, 1997, 2000, 2003, 2005

paradigm

nMusterbeispiel nt; (Gram) → Paradigma nt; paradigm shift (Pol) → Paradigmenwechsel m
Collins German Dictionary – Complete and Unabridged 7th Edition 2005. © William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1980 © HarperCollins Publishers 1991, 1997, 1999, 2004, 2005, 2007

paradigm

[ˈpærəˌdaɪm] nparadigma m
Collins Italian Dictionary 1st Edition © HarperCollins Publishers 1995
References in periodicals archive ?
As one of Paradigms leading valuation experts, Larry Backus was promoted to North Texas Market Leader.
The thesis discusses a number of aspects concerning the existence of derivational paradigms, their productivity, regularity, saturation and their typical characteristics.
LEADERSHIP MANAGEMENT About coping with change About coping with complexity Developing a vision and Planning, budgeting and strategies to achieve the vision allocating resources Leading between paradigms Managing within paradigms Motivating and inspiring Controlling and problem solving Strategic thinking Planning Determining the right thing to do Determining how to do things right Satisfying basic human needs Helping normal people who for achievement, a sense of behave in normal ways to belonging, recognition and self- complete routine jobs esteem successfully day after day Getting people to want to do Getting people to do what needs what needs to be done to be done Pull Push We need both leaders and managers.
The government's failed approaches over the years stem in no small measure from faulty paradigms about the urban poor.
'Paradigm pluralism' then is the normative doctrine that a plurality of paradigms should be allowed to coexist within the economics discipline and, ideally, should be allowed to compete and/or cooperate with each other in a fair manner.
Foundations of Public Administration: An Essay in its Paradigms
Paradigms are about several things, most notably about what is to be studied, what kind of research questions are supposed to be formulated in relation to these subjects, with what methods these studies should be conducted, and how their results should be interpreted.
Kuhn calls these regulating frameworks paradigms (models, hypotheses).
Newtonian paradigms acknowledge and reward employee actions useful in furthering the work of the organization A quantum paradigm is holistic in the sense that it values both the professional and private selves, both employees' work-related attributes and emotional and values dimensions Curtin (2011) reminds the reader that humans are hardwired psychologically to focus on what is wrong and missing, concentrating on inequities and dysfunctional aspects of rewards Thus, in her opinion, external reward systems deteriorate as a source of motivation and may become sources of grievance.
Considering this original meaning of paradigms, the members of a scientific community are both "believers" and "practitioners:" "Paradigms should not be understood as beliefs (even tacit beliefs) agreed upon by community members, but instead as exemplary ways of conceptualizing and intervening in particular situations" (Rouse 2003: 107; see also 1998: 35).
According to Mufti, there have so far been two strategic culture paradigms in Turkey: the 'Republican' paradigm and the counter 'Imperial' paradigm, which has had two distinct articulations.
Science can be thought of as containing themes and paradigms; themes are current areas of research, while paradigms comprise the dominant tool sets and existing knowledge that are used by current researchers.