paradox

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par·a·dox

 (păr′ə-dŏks′)
n.
1. A statement that seems to contradict itself but may nonetheless be true: the paradox that standing is more tiring than walking.
2. A person, thing, or situation that exhibits inexplicable or contradictory aspects: "The silence of midnight, to speak truly, though apparently a paradox, rung in my ears" (Mary Shelley).
3. A statement that is self-contradictory or logically untenable, though based on a valid deduction from acceptable premises.

[Latin paradoxum, from Greek paradoxon, from neuter sing. of paradoxos, conflicting with expectation : para-, beyond; see para-1 + doxa, opinion (from dokein, to think; see dek- in Indo-European roots).]

par′a·dox′i·cal adj.
par′a·dox′i·cal·ly adv.
par′a·dox′i·cal·ness n.

paradox

(ˈpærəˌdɒks)
n
1. a seemingly absurd or self-contradictory statement that is or may be true: religious truths are often expressed in paradox.
2. (Logic) a self-contradictory proposition, such as I always tell lies
3. a person or thing exhibiting apparently contradictory characteristics
4. an opinion that conflicts with common belief. Also called (rare): paradoxy
[C16: from Late Latin paradoxum, from Greek paradoxos opposed to existing notions, from para-1 + doxa opinion]
ˌparaˈdoxical adj
ˌparaˈdoxically adv

par•a•dox

(ˈpær əˌdɒks)

n.
1. a seemingly contradictory or absurd statement that expresses a possible truth.
2. a self-contradictory and false proposition.
3. a person, thing, or situation, exhibiting an apparently contradictory nature.
4. an opinion or statement contrary to commonly accepted opinion.
[1530–40; < Latin paradoxum < Greek parádoxon, n. use of neuter of parádoxos unbelievable, literally, beyond belief. See para-1, orthodox]
par`a•dox′i•cal, adj.
par`a•dox′i•cal•ly, adv.
par`a•dox′i•cal•ness, par`a•dox`i•cal′i•ty, n.

paradox

A statement which seems to contradict itself or lead to absurdity.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.paradox - (logic) a statement that contradicts itselfparadox - (logic) a statement that contradicts itself; "`I always lie' is a paradox because if it is true it must be false"
logic - the branch of philosophy that analyzes inference
contradiction in terms, contradiction - (logic) a statement that is necessarily false; "the statement `he is brave and he is not brave' is a contradiction"

paradox

noun contradiction, mystery, puzzle, ambiguity, anomaly, inconsistency, enigma, oddity, absurdity Death is a paradox, the end yet the beginning.
Translations
تَناقُض
paradox
paradoks
paradokso
paradoksi
paradoks
paradoxon
paradoks
òverstæîa, òversögn
矛盾逆説
paradoxum
paradoksasparadoksaluparadoksalus
paradokss
paradox
paradox
paradoks
paradox
ปฏิทรรศน์
парадокс

paradox

[ˈpærədɒks] Nparadoja f

paradox

[ˈpærədɒks] nparadoxe m

paradox

nParadox nt, → Paradoxon nt (liter); life/he is full of paradoxesdas Leben/er steckt voller Widersprüche

paradox

[ˈpærəˌdɒks] nparadosso

paradox

(ˈpӕrədoks) noun
a statement etc that seems to contradict itself but which is nevertheless true. If your birthday is on February 29 you could state the paradox that you are thirteen years old although you have only had three birthdays.
ˌparaˈdoxical adjective
ˌparaˈdoxically adverb
References in classic literature ?
There are not wanting, it is true, some promulgators of paradoxes who maintain that there is no necessary connection between geometrical and moral Irregularity.
Their moral eccentricities, like their oddities of dress, their wild theories and paradoxes, were an entertainment which amused her, but had not the slightest influence on her convictions.
It is the universal language of Mars, through the medium of which the higher and lower animals of this world of paradoxes are able to communicate to a greater or less extent, depending upon the intellectual sphere of the species and the development of the individual.
Though it is not they that are in fault, but the simpletons that extol them, and the fools that believe in them; and had I been the faithful duenna I should have been, his stale conceits would have never moved me, nor should I have been taken in by such phrases as 'in death I live,' 'in ice I burn,' 'in flames I shiver,' 'hopeless I hope,' 'I go and stay,' and paradoxes of that sort which their writings are full of.
Plato is most true to the character of his master when he describes him as "not of this world." And with this representation of him the ideal State and the other paradoxes of the Republic are quite in accordance, though they can not be shown to have been speculations of Socrates.
I grant that the reflexive property of infinity sometimes undermines particular liar paradoxes. Think of a finite list with n truths and n-1 falsehoods.
They implied that if we could really come to grips with the questions instead of just talking about them, we would find "hidden variables." We would discover things that resolved the paradoxes that inspired this Danish vision of nothingness, and reality would again be hard and reliable.
Chang, the vice president of biometrics at AMAG Pharmaceuticals, offers a comprehensive textbook that may also serve as a reference of paradoxes encountered in scientific and mathematical reasoning.
Each chapter examines the paradoxes inherent in a particular aspect or aspects of the conceit of textual progeny.
Global Marketing and Advertising: Understanding Cultural Paradoxes, 5th Edition
The anecdotes Berger recounted in the thirty-minute monologue are adaptations of well-known paradoxes: Zeno's paradoxes of motion and Bertrand Russell's paradox of set theory, which concerns the impossibility of a set's containing itself--hence the exhibition's title, "Not to Belong to Themselves." Berger's monologue, scripted by Garcia Torres together with the comedian and producer Eduardo Donjuan, transplants these intellectual games into everyday life, where they produce absurd situations.
The net result of these paradoxes in the life of millennials has been a reversal of their happiness as compared to baby boomers.