paramilitary

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Related to Paramilitarism: The Troubles

par·a·mil·i·tar·y

 (păr′ə-mĭl′ĭ-tĕr′ē)
adj.
Of, relating to, or being a group of civilians organized in a military fashion, especially to operate in place of or assist regular army troops.
n. pl. par·a·mil·i·tar·ies
A member of a paramilitary force.

paramilitary

(ˌpærəˈmɪlɪtərɪ; -trɪ)
adj
1. (Government, Politics & Diplomacy) denoting or relating to a group of personnel with military structure functioning either as a civil force or in support of military forces
2. (Government, Politics & Diplomacy) denoting or relating to a force with military structure conducting armed operations against a ruling or occupying power
n
(Government, Politics & Diplomacy)
a. a paramilitary force
b. a member of such a force

par•a•mil•i•tar•y

(ˌpær əˈmɪl ɪˌtɛr i)

adj., n., pl. -tar•ies. adj.
1. of or designating an organization operating in place of, as a supplement to, or in a manner resembling a regular military force.
n.
2. a person employed in such a force.
[1930–35]
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.paramilitary - a group of civilians organized in a military fashion (especially to operate in place of or to assist regular army troops)
fedayeen - (plural) Arab guerrillas who operate mainly against Israel
Fedayeen Saddam, Saddam's Martyrs - a feared paramilitary unit formed in 1995 by young soldiers to serve Saddam Hussein against domestic opponents
personnel, force - group of people willing to obey orders; "a public force is necessary to give security to the rights of citizens"
Adj.1.paramilitary - of or relating to a group of civilians organized to function like or to assist a military unit
Translations

paramilitary

[ˌpærəˈmɪlɪtərɪ]
A. ADJparamilitar
B. Nparamilitar mf

paramilitary

[ˌpærəˈmɪlɪtəri] adjparamilitaire

paramilitary

paramilitary

[ˌpærəˈmɪlɪtrɪ] adjparamilitare
References in periodicals archive ?
People found guilty of crimes linked to terrorism, paramilitarism and organised crime groups could see their sentences reconsidered under the Unduly Lenient Sentence scheme.
Paramilitarism developed under Maduro and his predecessor, Hugo Chavez, as a result of the erosion of the military, expansion of corruption and criminal networks in the government, and the devolution of state power to local loyalist groups.
The Perceptions of Paramilitarism in Northern Ireland: Findings From The 2017 Northern Ireland Life and Times Survey was released yesterday.
LIKE Sinn Fein, the DUP is controversial due to its historical links with paramilitarism.
Tensions within loyalist paramilitarism and criminality are among those lines of enquiry but they are not the only ones.
Their topics include poverty as a crime against humanity: international poverty law, human rights, and global justice from below; the road to San Fernando: theoretical frameworks as to forced migration and forced displacement within the context of global justice and human rights; Mexico, Colombia, state terror, and paramilitarism; and the right to community autonomy, justice, and security in Mexico and Colombia as a form of resistance.
The next day, from Havana, the FARC addressed the issue as well, and called on the government to make "a real commitment to ending paramilitarism, which isn't some invention of the guerrillas, or a tactic to delay the peace process." In a dispatch sent from the Cuban capital, the Associated Press news agency quoted rebel commander Pablo Catatumbo as saying, "We just saw how, with their armed strike, the paramilitaries slapped the Colombian people in the face in an attempt to interfere with the final peace accord." On April 15, the rebels again demanded an end to paramilitarism, saying they are willing to lay down their arms, but only if their safety can be guaranteed.
Paramilitarism and the Assault on Democracy in Haiti.
who were not part of Haiti's elite of large landholders and big business owners), first laying out the historical context of paramilitarism in Haiti in the last quarter of the 20th century and then exploring in detail the role of paramilitary violence, particularly that of the Front pour la Liberation et la Reconstruction Nationales (FLRN) in overthrowing the popular democratic administration of Jean-Bertrand Aristide in 2004 and suppressing his Fanmi Lavalas party.
In Ireland, youths who grew up in the heyday of the peace process are being lured into paramilitarism, thousands of people are lobbying online for the return of the state executions of murderers in Britain, Jihadists continue to plot mayhem, the philosopher kings of the far left are flirting with talk of "terror" and lone gunmen in England, the United States and Norway are using killing as the most decadent form of self-expression.
Inspired by these authors, Hristov proceeds to discuss how the rise of paramilitarism has paralleled the rise of neoliberalism in Colombia.
He said he wanted to encourage those previously engaged in paramilitarism to now help transform the social and economic situation in their communities.