parenesis

parenesis

(pəˈriːnɪˌsɪs; pəˈrɛnɪˌsɪs)
n
(Rhetoric) rhetoric exhortation; admonition
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References in periodicals archive ?
Ahora bien, la Escritura propone respuestas historicas, circunstanciales y no en forma teologica, sino de kerigma, exhortacion, parenesis, etc.
(36.) Dennis Duling and Norma Perrin, The New Testament: Proclamation and Parenesis, Myth and History, 3rd ed.
Ainda assim, em sintese, no que concerne a questao de como ler um dialogo platonico, Hadot retoma a posicao de Gaiser de que as obras escritas nao sao autossuficientes, posto que, antes de qualquer coisa, elas seriam definidas pela protrepsis e parenesis, ou seja, pela "exortacao" e pelo "encorajamento" a pratica da filosofia (Hadot, 2012, p.
Nevertheless, this radicalism contributed to weakening ethics not only in terms of disbelief in the voice of the Absolute, but also due to a paradox that closes the very access to ethics: the necessity of imitation without mimesis, ethics without parenesis, and ultimately a moral sense without literature struggling with the possibility of its representation.
He compares these examples of gnomic wisdom with Paul's parenesis in Romans 12, pointing out crucial differences between Paul and the Sages.
In Chapter 13 the author of Hebrews goes into extensive parenesis about many different aspects of community life.
These images later served as both a parenesis and a cultural script for Russian Spiritual Christians, who rejected the icons and priesthood of the state.