Parian ware


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Parian ware

Fine white porcelain resembling marble, produced in Britain and the US.
References in periodicals archive ?
Minton produced some of the finest examples of Parian ware, a marble-like unglazed porcelain body developed during the 1840s and used most successfully for sculptural pieces.
There is a stillness about this scene, a protracted-moment-in-time character that Smith likens to the effect of figurines in Parian ware or pure white Sevres porcelain.
Less expensive than bronze and more durable than plaster, soon just about every pottery company in the country was producing Parian ware.
For an obscure Irish sculptor, William Bryton Kirk (1824-1900), who from 1848 modelled at Worcester for parian ware, 41 works are listed, of which 40 are untraced but known by having been exhibited at the Royal Hibernian Academy.
The white, unglazed Parian ware figures, by Copeland, were extremely popular as prizes.
The name derives f om the Greek island of Paros, which is famed for its marble, Parian ware being thought to resemble the beauty of that stone.
The Chinese inspiration for lithophanes can be seen in a small mould-made Parian ware cup produced in China circa 1800.
Parian brought classical sculpture within the reach of the middle classes with their newfound wealth of the Industrial Revolution, and soon just about every pottery company in the country was producing Parian ware.
The exhibition also includes a set of bookends in the shapes of the famous winged bull and winged lion, made by Copeland after 1868 in 'Parian ware' (a glistening white porcelain that looked like marble) and a set of jugs by Ridgway & Abington, brightly coloured in green, pink and yellow, decorated with the same winged bulls and lions, with serpent handles.
IT might possibly give you the creeps, and you might think you are in Shiverpool, but the examples of the art of modelling in the translucent self-glazing white clay known as Parian Ware is still extremely sought after by collectors.