Parker Morris standard

Parker Morris standard

n
(Building) (often plural) (in Britain) a set of minimum criteria for good housing construction, design, and facilities, recommended by the 1961 report of the Central Housing Advisory Committee chaired by Sir Parker Morris. Subsequent governments have urged private and local authority house-builders to achieve these standards
References in periodicals archive ?
There was a time when the majority of citizens of Liverpool lived in rented accommodation, and the vast majority of those occupied what were known as Corpy housing; solid brick residences, uniform design but boasting the fact that the Parker Morris standard that applied to them was higher than the standards required for private housing.
Too often, rooms fail on basic functional requirements and much new public and private sector housing fails even to meet the Parker Morris standards for floor and storage space, developed as minimum requirements in the 1960s.
Up until 1981 we had building standards called the Parker Morris standards.
I hope now the Parker Morris standards can be reinstated for all new housing right across the country.
Whilst it's unlikely that the current Government would consider imposing minimum standards on the house building industry as happened in the late 1960s with Parker Morris standards, it is not unreasonable to expect the consumer to want the industry to at least demonstrate that their products are ergonomically functional and fit for purpose.
The houses are below Parker Morris standards in that they are smaller than the ideal house and we took this into account when considering the cost.
* Humane standards for new development, such as room sizes, overlooking distances, and the provision of outdoor space, were last set under the Parker Morris standards for public sector housing.