Parkinson's disease

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Par·kin·son's disease

 (pär′kĭn-sənz) also Par·kin·son disease (-sən)
n.
A progressive disease of the central nervous system, associated with the destruction of brain cells that produce dopamine and characterized by muscle tremors, muscle rigidity or stiffness, abnormally slow movement, and impaired balance and coordination. It usually affects people over the age of 50. Also called paralysis agitans.

[After James Parkinson (1755-1824), British physician.]
American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, Fifth Edition. Copyright © 2016 by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. All rights reserved.

Parkinson's disease

(ˈpɑːkɪnsənz)
n
(Pathology) a progressive chronic disorder of the central nervous system characterized by impaired muscular coordination and tremor. Often shortened to: Parkinson's Also called: Parkinsonism, Parkinson's syndrome, paralysis agitans or shaking palsy
[C19: named after James Parkinson (1755–1824), British surgeon, who first described it]
Collins English Dictionary – Complete and Unabridged, 12th Edition 2014 © HarperCollins Publishers 1991, 1994, 1998, 2000, 2003, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2011, 2014

Par′kin•son's disease`

(ˈpɑr kɪn səns)
n.
a neurologic disease believed to be caused by deterioration of the brain cells that produce dopamine, occurring primarily after the age of 60, and characterized by tremors, esp. of the fingers and hands, muscle rigidity, and a shuffling gait. Also called par′kin•son•ism (-səˌnɪz əm)
[1870–75; after James Parkinson (1755–1824), English physician who first described it]
Random House Kernerman Webster's College Dictionary, © 2010 K Dictionaries Ltd. Copyright 2005, 1997, 1991 by Random House, Inc. All rights reserved.

Par·kin·son's disease

(pär′kĭn-sənz)
A disease of the brain, usually in older people, that tends to become more severe over time. Symptoms include shaking, slowed movement, and rigid muscles.
The American Heritage® Student Science Dictionary, Second Edition. Copyright © 2014 by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. All rights reserved.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.Parkinson's disease - a degenerative disorder of the central nervous system characterized by tremor and impaired muscular coordination
tremor - shaking or trembling (usually resulting from weakness or stress or disease)
degenerative disorder - condition leading to progressive loss of function
brain disease, brain disorder, encephalopathy - any disorder or disease of the brain
Based on WordNet 3.0, Farlex clipart collection. © 2003-2012 Princeton University, Farlex Inc.
Translations

Parkinson's disease

[ˈpɑːkɪnsənzdɪˌziːz] Nenfermedad f de Parkinson
Collins Spanish Dictionary - Complete and Unabridged 8th Edition 2005 © William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1971, 1988 © HarperCollins Publishers 1992, 1993, 1996, 1997, 2000, 2003, 2005

Parkinson's disease

n. enfermedad de Parkinson, atrofia o degeneración de los nervios cerebrales que se manifiesta con temblores, debilidad muscular progresiva, cambios en el habla, la manera de andar y la postura.
English-Spanish Medical Dictionary © Farlex 2012
References in classic literature ?
They both spoke to the dingy dresser by name, calling him Parkinson, and asking for the lady as Miss Aurora Rome.
The presence of the one man who did not care about her increased Miss Rome's sense that everybody else was in love with her, and each in a somewhat dangerous way: the actor with all the appetite of a savage and a spoilt child; the soldier with all the simple selfishness of a man of will rather than mind; Sir Wilson with that daily hardening concentration with which old Hedonists take to a hobby; nay, even the abject Parkinson, who had known her before her triumphs, and who followed her about the room with eyes or feet, with the dumb fascination of a dog.
He had already handed his spear in a lordly style, like a sceptre, to the piteous Parkinson, and was about to assume one of the cushioned seats like a throne.
Father Brown and Parkinson were left alone, and they were neither of them men with a taste for superfluous conversation.
Father Brown seemed quite unconscious of this cloud of witnesses, but followed Parkinson with an idly attentive eye till he took himself and his absurd spear into the farther room of Bruno.
As he did so, old Parkinson tottered in his wavering way out of the door and caught sight of the corpse lying in the passage.
"This poor fellow was gone when I got across to him." And he stood looking down at old Parkinson, who sat in a black huddle on the gorgeous chair.
And spears catch at the end of the steel just like daggers, if they're that sort of fancy spear they had in theatres; like the spear poor old Parkinson killed his wife with, just when she'd sent for me to settle their family troubles-- and I came just too late, God forgive me!
"If Parkinson did it with that pantomime spear," said Butler, "he must have thrust from four yards away.
She struggled to free herself, and as she did so Parkinson came out of the prisoner's room and lunged with the spear."
"You will find me here when Parkinson has shown you round."