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1. An area of land set aside for public use, as:
a. A piece of land with few or no buildings within or adjoining a town, maintained for recreational and ornamental purposes.
b. A landscaped city square.
c. A large tract of rural land kept in its natural state and usually reserved for the enjoyment and recreation of visitors.
2. A broad, fairly level valley between mountain ranges: the high parks of the Rocky Mountains.
3. A tract of land attached to a country house, especially when including extensive gardens, woods, pastures, or a game preserve.
4. Sports A stadium or an enclosed playing field: a baseball park.
a. An area where military vehicles or artillery are stored and serviced.
b. The materiel kept in such an area.
6. An area in or near a town designed and usually zoned for a certain purpose: a commercial park.
7. A position in an automatic transmission that disengages the gears and sets the brake so the vehicle cannot move: put the car in park and turned off the engine.
v. parked, park·ing, parks
1. To put or leave (a vehicle) for a time in a certain location.
2. Aerospace To place (a spacecraft or satellite) in a usually temporary orbit.
3. Informal To place or leave temporarily: parked the baby with neighbors; parking cash in a local bank account.
4. To assemble (artillery or other equipment) in a military park.
1. To park a motor vehicle: pulled over and parked next to the curb.
2. Slang To engage in kissing and caressing in a vehicle stopped in a secluded spot.

[Middle English, game preserve, enclosed tract of land, from Old French parc, from Vulgar Latin *parricus, fence, from *parra, perhaps, "wooden bar, espalier"; akin to Spanish parra, grapevine grown in an espalier, and French barre, bar; see barre.]

park′er n.


 (pärks), Rosa 1913-2005.
American civil rights leader. Her refusal to give up her seat on a bus to a white man in Montgomery, Alabama, in 1955 resulted in a citywide bus boycott that helped launch the national civil rights movement.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.Parks - United States civil rights leader who refused to give up her seat on a bus to a white man in Montgomery (Alabama) and so triggered the national Civil Rights movement (born in 1913)
References in classic literature ?
At the end of a year he had stopped writing letters, and only once in a long time, when he was lonely or when he went into one of the city parks and saw the moon shining on the grass as it had shone that night on the meadow by Wine Creek, did he think of her at all.
If a young man with an idea can once get Jim Burden's attention, can manage to accompany him when he goes off into the wilds hunting for lost parks or exploring new canyons, then the money which means action is usually forthcoming.
Yet, in spite of this, nowhere in all America will you find more patrician-like houses; parks and gardens more opulent, than in New Bedford.
We stood about fifteen and a half hands high; we were therefore just as good for riding as we were for driving, and our master used to say that he disliked either horse or man that could do but one thing; and as he did not want to show off in London parks, he preferred a more active and useful kind of horse.
Excepting for that one walk when he left jail, when he was too much worried to notice anything, and for a few times that he had rested in the city parks in the winter time when he was out of work, he had literally never seen a tree
In the dueling-house, in the parks, on the street, and anywhere and everywhere that the students go, caps of a color group themselves together.
I ain't sure but she's goin' to turn out somethin' remarkable,--a singer, or a writer, or a lady doctor like that Miss Parks up to Cornish.
Then up rose Mrs Cratchit, Cratchit's wife, dressed out but poorly in a twice-turned gown, but brave in ribbons, which are cheap and make a goodly show for sixpence; and she laid the cloth, assisted by Belinda Cratchit, second of her daughters, also brave in ribbons; while Master Peter Cratchit plunged a fork into the saucepan of potatoes, and getting the corners of his monstrous shirt collar (Bob's private property, conferred upon his son and heir in honour of the day) into his mouth, rejoiced to find himself so gallantly attired, and yearned to show his linen in the fashionable Parks.
Waterbrook softened towards me considerably, and inquired, firstly, if I went much into the parks, and secondly, if I went much into society.
Like a lion in a menagerie, it is a survival of the extinct chaos entrapped and exhibited amid the smug parks and well-rolled downs of England.
It seemed to me rather a pretty little creature; and as Montgomery stated that it never destroyed the turf by burrowing, and was very cleanly in its habits, I should imagine it might prove a convenient substitute for the common rabbit in gentlemen's parks.
The sufferings of the travellers among these savage mountains were extreme: for a part of the time they were nearly starved; at length, they made their way through them, and came down upon the plains of New California, a fertile region extending along the coast, with magnificent forests, verdant savannas, and prairies that looked like stately parks.

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