Parnassus


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Par·nas·sus

 (pär-năs′əs) also Par·nas·sós (-nä-sôs′)
A mountain, about 2,457 m (8,061 ft) high, of central Greece north of the Gulf of Corinth. In ancient times it was sacred to Apollo, Dionysus, and the Muses. Delphi was at the foot of the mountain.

Parnassus

(pɑːˈnæsəs)
n
1. (Placename) Mount Parnassus a mountain in central Greece, in NW Boeotia: in ancient times sacred to Dionysus, Apollo, and the Muses, with the Castalian Spring and Delphi on its slopes. Height: 2457 m (8061 ft). Modern Greek names: Parnassós or Liákoura
2. (Poetry)
a. the world of poetry
b. a centre of poetic or other creative activity
3. (Poetry) a collection of verse or belles-lettres

Par•nas•sus

(pɑrˈnæs əs)

n.
Mount, a mountain in central Greece, N of the Gulf of Corinth and near Delphi. ab. 8000 ft. (2440 m).
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.Parnassus - (Greek mythology) a mountain in central Greece where (according to Greek mythology) the Muses livedParnassus - (Greek mythology) a mountain in central Greece where (according to Greek mythology) the Muses lived; known as the mythological home of music and poetry; "Liakoura is the modern name of Mount Parnassus"
Greek mythology - the mythology of the ancient Greeks
Ellas, Greece, Hellenic Republic - a republic in southeastern Europe on the southern part of the Balkan peninsula; known for grapes and olives and olive oil
Translations

Parnassus

[pɑːˈnæsəs] NParnaso m

Parnassus

n Mount Parnassusder Parnass

Parnassus

[pɑːˈnæsəs] n (Geog, Myth) → Parnaso
References in classic literature ?
The antients may be considered as a rich common, where every person who hath the smallest tenement in Parnassus hath a free right to fatten his muse.
In like manner are the antients, such as Homer, Virgil, Horace, Cicero, and the rest, to be esteemed among us writers, as so many wealthy squires, from whom we, the poor of Parnassus, claim an immemorial custom of taking whatever we can come at.
In composing the Odyssey he did not include all the adventures of Odysseus--such as his wound on Parnassus, or his feigned madness at the mustering of the host--incidents between which there was no necessary or probable connection: but he made the Odyssey, and likewise the Iliad, to centre round an action that in our sense of the word is one.
Parnassus with his excellent grandfather Autolycus--who was the most accomplished thief and perjurer in the whole world--and with the sons of Autolycus.
Parnassus, where my possessions lie, I will make him a present and will send him on his way rejoicing.
They alone will visit Athens and Delphi, and either shrine of intellectual song--that upon the Acropolis, encircled by blue seas; that under Parnassus, where the eagles build and the bronze charioteer drives undismayed towards infinity.
We started the next morning for Parnassus, the double-peaked Parnassus.
He was the fad of the hour, the adventurer who had stormed Parnassus while the gods nodded.
On the slope of Mount Parnassus was the famous Delphi, whither Cadmus was going.
He so often disturbed Pelisson, that the latter, raising his head, crossly said, "At least, La Fontaine, supply me with a rhyme, since you have the run of the gardens at Parnassus.
And Zeus set it fast in the wide-pathed earth at goodly Pytho under the glens of Parnassus, to be a sign thenceforth and a marvel to mortal men (20).
Boccalini, in his "Advertisements from Parnassus," tells us that Zoilus once presented Apollo a very caustic criticism upon a very admirable book: -- whereupon the god asked him for the beauties of the work.