paronymy


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paronymy

(pəˈrɒnɪmɪ)
n
1. (Rhetoric) rhetoric a play on words
2. (Linguistics) linguistics the relationship between words with related derivations but different syntactic use
3. (Linguistics) linguistics the formation of a word based on a word from another language with little or no alteration in spelling or pronunciation
4. (Linguistics) linguistics the relationship between such words
Collins English Dictionary – Complete and Unabridged, 12th Edition 2014 © HarperCollins Publishers 1991, 1994, 1998, 2000, 2003, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2011, 2014

paronymy

the state or condition of containing the same root or stem, as perilous and parlous. — paronym, n.
See also: Linguistics
-Ologies & -Isms. Copyright 2008 The Gale Group, Inc. All rights reserved.
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References in periodicals archive ?
On the other hand, we have labeled polysemy, synonymy, paronymy, and homonymy as infelicitous or rather inadvisable semantic relations in the case of terminological research.
Metaphysics and the Paronymy of Names, WILLIAM LYCAN
The authors of these dictionaries focused on the phenomenon of paronymy. Even though they attempted to illustrate the difference between confusingly similar words in Russian, questions concerning the criteria of distinguishing such pairs of words still arise.
Formally, then, humour-generating mechanisms include the processes of homonymy, homophony, paronymy and homography,(3) whereas the semantic requirement for triggering language-dependent humour is satisfied by a safe distance between the meaning constituents at play.
More specifically, "wordplay" is understood as a blanket term for all sorts of playful experiments with words, whereas "pun" is taken to refer to those instances of verbal humour which rest on the above-mentioned linguistic mechanisms of homonymy, homophony and paronymy (to the exclusion of homography for reasons set out in footnote 3).
On the Romanian linguistics territory paronymy is mainly studied, and sporadically--since a research of Mr.
(17) The difficulty is that none of these will work for the predicate 'human': as we may expect in view of the claim about substance in Categories 5, 'human' has no contrary, privation or contradictory, does not admit of comparison, and paronymy does not make it off the ground.
The qualitative study is essentially two-partite and, initially, sets out to investigate linguistic phenomena which lay down the framework of formal relationships in a pun (and are, thus, in a mutually exclusive way, obligatory for its creation), namely homonymy, homophony and paronymy. Next, punning forms are grouped into interlingual puns, proper name puns as well as idiom- and compound-based puns.
On the one hand, the new lexeme rhymes with the substituted constituent, and on the other, thanks to the reduction and through the paronymy, it relates with the constituent that was previously placed in its position:
A word like martini is then folk-etymologically integrated as ma-ti-ni, a new lexical item literally meaning `horse hits man', simply because of the paronymy between the Chinese morphemes and the English sounds and syllables; thus foreign word (not integrated) and loanword (integrated) may exist side by side.
The eight-page introduction (tellingly labeled "preface") is even more idiosyncratic than the translations, and readers not familiar with the arcane vocabulary of literary criticism will not be able to manage it without frequent recourse to a dictionary; whereas Felstiner in a passage quoted above eschewed even the mild technical phrase "trochaic" in favor of "four-syllable on-off beat," the Popov / McHugh introduction (and the same is true of the notes) reverberates with technical terms like paronymy and other esoteric vocabulary (mephitic), in addition, of course, to words found or invented to reflect Celan's problematic formulations.
We may speculate that this distinction is the source of the Aristotelian notion of paronymy, Categories 1a12-15.