Parousia

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Par·ou·si·a

 (pär′o͞o-sē′ə, pə-ro͞o′zē-ə)
n.
The Second Coming.

[Greek parousiā, presence, Parousia, from parousa, feminine present participle of pareinai, to be present : para-, beside; see para-1 + einai, to be; see es- in Indo-European roots.]
American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, Fifth Edition. Copyright © 2016 by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. All rights reserved.

parousia

(pəˈruːsɪə)
n
(Theology) Christianity another term for the Second Coming
[C19: from Greek: presence]
Collins English Dictionary – Complete and Unabridged, 12th Edition 2014 © HarperCollins Publishers 1991, 1994, 1998, 2000, 2003, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2011, 2014

Sec′ond Com′ing


n.
the coming of Christ on Judgment Day.
Random House Kernerman Webster's College Dictionary, © 2010 K Dictionaries Ltd. Copyright 2005, 1997, 1991 by Random House, Inc. All rights reserved.

Parousia

the coming of Christ on Judgement Day. Also called Second Advent, Second Coming.
See also: Christianity
-Ologies & -Isms. Copyright 2008 The Gale Group, Inc. All rights reserved.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.Parousia - (Christian theology) the reappearance of Jesus as judge for the Last JudgmentParousia - (Christian theology) the reappearance of Jesus as judge for the Last Judgment
Christian theology - the teachings of Christian churches
Based on WordNet 3.0, Farlex clipart collection. © 2003-2012 Princeton University, Farlex Inc.
References in periodicals archive ?
As Stanton describes the social situation of the Matthean communities, Matthew, in the face of strong Jewish criticism to the effect that Jesus' life did not correspond with prophecy concerning the coming of the Messiah, countered with perhaps the earliest form of the ~two parousias' schema found in the writings of Origen and Justin.
If, however, one takes account of the plot of Matthew, Stanton's argument raises three questions: is it indeed the persistent function of ~Son of David', more than any other christological strand, to serve as a lightning rod for the Jewish leaders to exhibit ~hostility' toward Jesus?; is it in fact the ~humility' of Jesus specifically as the Son of David that Matthew contrasts with the splendour that will be Jesus' at his second coming?; and does Matthew, in truth, mediate the earliest example of the ~two parousias' schema found later in Justin and Origen?
The third question posed above asks whether one does indeed find in Matthew the earliest example of the ~two parousias' schema found in later Christian writings.