spondylolysis

(redirected from Pars defect)
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Related to Pars defect: Pars interarticularis defect

spondylolysis

(ˌspɒndɪˈlɒlɪsɪs)
n
(Pathology) the destruction of the vertebra
Translations

spon·dy·lol·y·sis

n. espondilólisis, disolución o destrucción de una vértebra.

spondylolysis

n espondilolisis f
References in periodicals archive ?
Patients and methods: Between February 2013 and December 2015, a total of 102 male patients with bilateral L5 pars defect including 53 with spondylolysis and 49 control subjects were included in this case-control study.
Saifuddin and coworkers (19) demonstrated that the mean angle of the pars defect as measured by CT is 23[degrees] with respect to the coronal plane.
Donaldson's genetic spinal condition - a unilateral pars defect in the lower back, which in turn was irritating a lumbar disc - left the sportsman barely able to pick up a golf ball.
This non-slipped pars defect is called a "Spondylolysis" and is almost always a precursor to the actual forward slippage.
The 34-year-old played only 10 European Tour events in 2004 during a battle with Pars Defect, a spinal problem.
It has emerged that the Baggies star has missed the last four games due to a small fracture in the spine, known as Pars Defect.
He puts it down to Pars Defect, which is effectively stress fractures to the bone, common in people who overtrain in activities.
Single photon emission computed tomography and MRI of her right hip ruled out a pars defect.
We're trying to see if we can find that perfect slice thickness and parameters to make MRI useful for evaluating the pars defect.
Next, direct repair of the pars defect at L3 was done using pedicle screws bilaterally at the L3 pedicles.
While historical use of MRI has not been recommended for detecting pars defects because of its inability to display adequate bony anatomy, more recent studies have suggested that specific sequences can allow for a high interobserver and intraobserver reliability compared to CT and SPECT scans, leading to an adopted classification system (40).
Even in the presence of bilateral pars defects, considered archetypical of instability, studies using biplanar radiography (Pearcy and Shepherd 1985), steroephotogrammetry (Axelsonsson et al 2000) or functional magnetic resonance imaging (McGregor et al 2002) found no evidence of excess translation.
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