parsing

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Related to Parseable: Machine parsable

parse

 (pärs)
v. parsed, pars·ing, pars·es
v.tr.
1.
a. To break (a sentence) down into its component parts of speech with an explanation of the form, function, and syntactical relationship of each part.
b. To describe (a word) by stating its part of speech, form, and syntactical relationships in a sentence.
c. To process (linguistic data such as speech or written language) in real time as it is being spoken or read, in order to determine its linguistic structure and meaning.
2.
a. To examine closely or subject to detailed analysis, especially by breaking up into components: "What are we missing by parsing the behavior of chimpanzees into the conventional categories recognized largely from our own behavior?" (Stephen Jay Gould).
b. To make sense of; comprehend: I simply couldn't parse what you just said.
3. Computers To analyze or separate (input, for example) into more easily processed components.
v.intr.
To admit of being parsed: sentences that do not parse easily.

[Probably from Middle English pars, part of speech, from Latin pars (ōrātiōnis), part (of speech); see perə- in Indo-European roots.]

pars′er n.
Translations

parsing

[ˈpɑːzɪŋ] Nanálisis m inv sintáctico or gramatical

parsing

n (Gram) → Syntaxanalyse f; (Comput) → Parsing nt
References in periodicals archive ?
If x [equivalent to] x', then we have infinite embedding, which is computationally possible but neurologically impossible, because there must be a halting algorithm for interpretation purposes: a syntactic object featuring infinite embedding is simply not parseable due to limited memory issues.
Making the data easily parseable, whether the data is being sent as data fields or in a document, is also key.
Necessity is to export data in a format parseable in the standard operating systems used at the University of Pardubice.
In Tantek's words, information on the web should be "Presentable and Parseable.
When I discovered a few passages where Dryden's rendition seems a bit fuzzy and not quite accurate, I decided to slog along with my own parseable prose.
The key to making these messages parseable is that they must adhere to the standard United States Message Traffic Format (USMTF).