Parsons

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Par·sons

 (pär′sənz), Talcott 1902-1979.
American sociologist noted for analyzing social structures in terms of their social functions.

Par·son′i·an (pär-sō′nē-ən) adj.

Parsons

, William Third Earl of Rosse. 1800-1867.
British astronomer who constructed what was then the largest telescope in the world, incorporating many innovations in telescope construction.
American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, Fifth Edition. Copyright © 2016 by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. All rights reserved.

Parsons

(ˈpɑːsənz)
n
1. (Biography) Sir Charles Algernon. 1854–1931, English engineer, who developed the steam turbine
2. (Biography) Gram, real name Cecil Connor. 1946–73 US country-rock singer and songwriter; founder of the Flying Burrito Brothers (1968–70), he later released the solo albums G.P. (1973) and Grievous Angel (1974)
3. (Biography) Talcott. 1902–79, US sociologist, author of The Structure of Social Action (1937) and The Social System (1951)
Collins English Dictionary – Complete and Unabridged, 12th Edition 2014 © HarperCollins Publishers 1991, 1994, 1998, 2000, 2003, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2011, 2014
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Noun1.Parsons - United States sociologist (1902-1979)
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References in periodicals archive ?
(It might be noted that Barnes's critique does not apply merely to rational choice theorists; he believes that there is a pernicious individualism lying at the foundation of Parsonian sociology as well [pp.
On the other hand, what is distinctive about this theoretical project is the extent to which it represents a decision to move outside political science and to take as the model for theory leading arguments in sociology and social psychology, above all, Parsonian structural-functionalism.
In sociology, and ethnomethodology, in particular, the idea that routines are effortful accomplishments was a reaction to the Parsonian tendency to view social agents as judgmental dopes whose behavior was predetermined by social structure (Heritage, 1984).
Students are introduced, for example, to a number of theories or perspectives in the autumn term, say functionalism or Parsonian theory, only to be told that they are dangerous and dying, if not dead.
This view also runs against Parsonian theory, which portrays lawyers as mediators between the state and private business.
The mid-century Parsonian model also assumed the conventional heterosexual nuclear family to be the bedrock of society and functional to the individuals in it--women's "emotional" role and' men's "instrumental" role optimal for socializing children and meeting the psychological needs of adults (Parsons and Bales 1955).
Kunelius, Risto; Reunanen, Esa: Media in political power: a Parsonian view on the differentiated mediatization of Finnish decision makers.
First and negatively, he avoided becoming caught up in debates over Parsonian functionalism.
The notion of integration, on the other hand, at least for the followers of the Durkheimian and Parsonian theory (Durkheim, 1933; Parsons, 1968), refers to the interpenetration and interdependence of the previously divided social subsystems.
This book sounds faintly Parsonian as it is focused around the theory of individualization--that traditional social relationships, bonds and belief systems that used to determine people's lives have been losing more of their meaning, opening up new options for individuals to shape their own lives.
This line of research not only continues in the Parsonian tradition but also shows much promise for developing interventions to assist a subset of the population to achieve their academic and vocational promise.
And even if one does not subscribe to the argument that there are no economic ends, and net income is seen as a particular economic end of market exchange, this end can reflect no more than Weberian ideal interests, including religious grace, ethic, traditions, or emotions, as well as power and status, Veblenian prestige considerations, Pareto residues and derivations, Dukheimian morality and Parsonian normative conformity, Marxian class and other social conflicts, and so forth.