Parthenos


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Parthenos

(ˈpɑːθɪˌnɒs)
n
(Classical Myth & Legend) an epithet meaning "Virgin", applied by the Greeks to several goddesses, esp Athena
Collins English Dictionary – Complete and Unabridged, 12th Edition 2014 © HarperCollins Publishers 1991, 1994, 1998, 2000, 2003, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2011, 2014
References in periodicals archive ?
Yet the Septuagint (and Matthew afterwards) translated 'almah with the Greek parthenos, a young, usually virgin, girl.
The d'Aulaires could not base their illustration of the birth of Athena on its most famous representation in the ancient world, the one on the east pediment of the temple of Athena Parthenos on the Athenian Acropolis.
The narrator (28) confirms Penelope's construction as a virgin bride by describing Penelope in ways similar to Nausicaa, the Odyssey's own archetypal parthenos who is ready for marriage.
On the other hand, a parthenos who shows interest in domestic affairs is admired by her community, since "It is from such things that a good reputation among people/springs up, giving pleasure to your father and the lady your mother" ([TEXT NOT REPRODUCIBLE IN ASCII].
The Parthenon, dedicated to Athena Parthenos, "Athena the Virgin", is the most well-known monument of that building project.
La joven es designada en los terminos imagisticos que traducen en el imaginario poetico antiguo el estatuto de la parthenos como potrilla que ha de ser domada en el matrimonio, aunque en su caso sus progenitores sean devaluados por su comportamiento en la guerra de Troya y ella misma, infertil, sea asimilada una novilla esteril.
From its first moments, Electra departs from the normative social roles enshrined in Greek ritual by depicting its eponymous character as a married parthenos (virgin).
More controversially, Frazer and fellow anthropologist Robert Briffault (1927/1959) assert that the correct translation of the Greek word parthenos (applied to the goddess Artemis, for instance), is not 'virgin' but 'unmarried woman' (Frazer, 1911, p.