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par·ti·cle

 (pär′tĭ-kəl)
n.
1. A very small piece or part; a tiny portion or speck.
2. A very small or the smallest possible amount, trace, or degree: not a particle of doubt.
3. Physics
a. A body whose spatial extent and internal motion and structure, if any, are irrelevant in a specific problem.
b. An elementary particle.
c. A subatomic particle.
4. Linguistics
a. An uninflected item that has grammatical function but does not clearly belong to one of the major parts of speech, such as up in He looked up the word or to in English infinitives.
b. In some systems of grammatical analysis, any of various short function words, including articles, prepositions, and conjunctions.
5. Ecclesiastical A portion or fragment of the Eucharistic host.
6. Archaic A small part of something written, such as a clause of a document.

[Middle English, from Latin particula, diminutive of pars, part-, part; see part.]

particle

(ˈpɑːtɪkəl)
n
1. an extremely small piece of matter; speck
2. a very tiny amount; iota: it doesn't make a particle of difference.
3. (Grammar) a function word, esp (in certain languages) a word belonging to an uninflected class having suprasegmental or grammatical function: the Greek particles "mēn'" and "de" are used to express contrast; questions in Japanese are indicated by the particle "ka"; English "up" is sometimes regarded as an adverbial particle.
4. (Linguistics) a common affix, such as re-, un-, or -ness
5. (General Physics) physics a body with finite mass that can be treated as having negligible size, and internal structure
6. (General Physics) See elementary particle
7. (Roman Catholic Church) RC Church a small piece broken off from the Host at Mass
8. (Printing, Lithography & Bookbinding) archaic a section or clause of a document
[C14: from Latin particula a small part, from pars part]

par•ti•cle

(ˈpɑr tɪ kəl)

n.
1. a minute portion, piece, or amount; a very small bit: a particle of dust.
2. one of the extremely small constituents of matter, as an atom, proton, quark, or gluon.
3. a clause or article, as of a document.
4. Gram. any of various small, usu. uninflected words or affixes having functional or relational rather than lexical use and in some languages constituting a form class: in English often applied to words like to used in forming the infinitive or the word following the verb in a phrasal verb, as up in get up.
5. a small piece of the Host given to each lay communicant in a Eucharistic service.
[1350–1400; Middle English < Latin particula]

par·ti·cle

(pär′tĭ-kəl)
1. A very small piece of solid matter; a speck: particles of dust.
2. An elementary or subatomic particle.

particle

A short uninflected word used in conjunction with another word, such as “up” in “turn up.”
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.particle - (nontechnical usage) a tiny piece of anythingparticle - (nontechnical usage) a tiny piece of anything
grain - a relatively small granular particle of a substance; "a grain of sand"; "a grain of sugar"
grinding - material resulting from the process of grinding; "vegetable grindings clogged the drain"
material, stuff - the tangible substance that goes into the makeup of a physical object; "coal is a hard black material"; "wheat is the stuff they use to make bread"
chylomicron - a microscopic particle of triglycerides produced in the intestines during digestion; in the bloodstream they release their fatty acids into the blood
flyspeck - a tiny dark speck made by the excrement of a fly
identification particle - a tiny particle of material that can be added to a product to indicate the source of manufacture
2.particle - a body having finite mass and internal structure but negligible dimensions
virion - (virology) a complete viral particle; nucleic acid and capsid (and a lipid envelope in some viruses)
alpha particle - a positively charged particle that is the nucleus of the helium atom; emitted from natural or radioactive isotopes
beta particle - a high-speed electron or positron emitted in the decay of a radioactive isotope
body - an individual 3-dimensional object that has mass and that is distinguishable from other objects; "heavenly body"
boson - any particle that obeys Bose-Einstein statistics but not the Pauli exclusion principle; all nuclei with an even mass number are bosons
deuteron - the nucleus of deuterium; consists of one proton and one neutron; used as a bombarding particle in accelerators
elementary particle, fundamental particle - (physics) a particle that is less complex than an atom; regarded as constituents of all matter
fermion - any particle that obeys Fermi-Dirac statistics and is subject to the Pauli exclusion principle
ion - a particle that is electrically charged (positive or negative); an atom or molecule or group that has lost or gained one or more electrons
magnetic monopole - a hypothetical particle with a single magnetic pole instead of the usual two
micelle - an electrically charged particle built up from polymeric molecules or ions and occurring in certain colloidal electrolytic solutions like soaps and detergents
prion - (microbiology) an infectious protein particle similar to a virus but lacking nucleic acid; thought to be the agent responsible for scrapie and other degenerative diseases of the nervous system
virino - (microbiology) a hypothetical infectious particle thought to be the cause of scrapie and other degenerative diseases of the central nervous system; consists of nucleic acid in a protective coat of host cell proteins
scintilla - a sparkling glittering particle
superstring - a hypothetical particle that is the elementary particle in a theory of space-time
thermion - an electrically charged particle (electron or ion) emitted by a substance at a high temperature
3.particle - a function word that can be used in English to form phrasal verbs
closed-class word, function word - a word that is uninflected and serves a grammatical function but has little identifiable meaning

particle

noun bit, piece, scrap, grain, molecule, atom, shred, crumb, mite, jot, speck, mote, whit, tittle, iota Particles of food can get stuck between the teeth.

particle

noun
Translations
جُسَيْم
částečkačásticesmítko
partikel
hiukkanenpartikkeli
čestica
elemi részecskepartikularészecskeviszonyszó
ögnsmáorð
dalelytėkrislas
daļiņakripatiņa
cząstkapartykuła
čiastočka
parçacıkzerre

particle

[ˈpɑːtɪkl]
A. N
1. (gen) → partícula f; [of dust] → partícula f, grano m (fig) → pizca f
there's not a particle of truth in iteso no tiene ni pizca de verdad
2. (Phys, Gram) → partícula f
B. CPD particle accelerator Nacelerador m de partículas
particle board N (US) → madera f aglomerada
particle physics Nfísica f de partículas

particle

[ˈpɑːrtɪkəl] n
(PHYSICS)particule f
(= small amount) → particule f
dust particles, particles of dust → des particules de poussières
food particles, particles of food → des particules de nourriture
a particle of truth → une parcelle de vérité
(LINGUISTICS)particule fparticle accelerator naccélérateur m de particulesparticle physics nphysique f des particules

particle

n
(of sand etc)Teilchen nt, → Körnchen nt; (Phys) → Teilchen nt; (fig)Körnchen nt; particle of dust, dust particleStäubchen nt, → Staubkörnchen nt, → Staubpartikel nt (spec); food particlesNahrungspartikel pl; there’s not a particle of truth in itdarin steckt kein Körnchen Wahrheit
(Gram) → Partikel f

particle

:
particle accelerator
particle board
n (US) → Spanplatte f

particle

[ˈpɑːtɪkl] n (Gram, Phys) → particella; (of dust) → granello; (of food) → pezzettino (fig) (of truth, sense) → briciolo

particle

(ˈpaːtikl) noun
a very small piece. a particle of dust.

par·ti·cle

n. partícula, porción ínfima de una materia.

particle

n partícula
References in classic literature ?
These are called "licks" or "salt licks," in the language of the country, from the circumstance that the quadruped is often obliged to lick the earth, in order to obtain the saline particles.
Were there not the brilliant particles of a halo in the air about his head?
thought I, ha, as the flying particles almost choked me, are these ashes from that destroyed city, Gomorrah?
Your money came out of, or went into, wormy old wooden drawers, particles of which flew up your nose and down your throat when they were opened and shut.
The sky was gloomy, and the shortest streets were choked up with a dingy mist, half thawed, half frozen, whose heavier particles descended in shower of sooty atoms, as if all the chimneys in Great Britain had, by one consent, caught fire, and were blazing away to their dear hearts' content.
The frozen particles of ice, brushed from the blades of grass by the wind, and borne across my face; the hard clatter of the horse's hoofs, beating a tune upon the ground; the stiff-tilled soil; the snowdrift, lightly eddying in the chalk-pit as the breeze ruffled it; the smoking team with the waggon of old hay, stopping to breathe on the hill-top, and shaking their bells musically; the whitened slopes and sweeps of Down-land lying against the dark sky, as if they were drawn on a huge slate!
Some were condensing air into a dry tangible substance, by extracting the nitre, and letting the aqueous or fluid particles percolate; others softening marble, for pillows and pin-cushions; others petrifying the hoofs of a living horse, to preserve them from foundering.
And just as the particles of a human body change every six or seven years, without disturb- ing the body, so the particles of our telephone systems have changed repeatedly without any interruption of traffic.
The garden, about half an acre in size, is margined by the Brillante, so named from the particles of mica which sparkle in its bed elsewhere than in the Val- Noble, where its shallow waters are stained by the dyehouses, and loaded with refuse from the other industries of the town.
It is only a massing of phosphoric particles," cried one of the officers.
Nor could the young bride any longer deny that a radiance was breaking through the mist, and changing its dim hue to a dusky red, which continually grew more vivid, as if brilliant particles were interfused with the gloom.
Thrusting his hand, then, into the bosom of this capacious receptacle, he first brought to light about a pound of tobacco, whose component parts still adhered together, the whole outside being covered with soft particles of sea-bread.