Pascal's triangle

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Pascal's triangle

n.
A triangle of numbers in which a row represents the coefficients of the binomial series. The triangle is bordered by ones on the right and left sides, and each interior entry is the sum of the two entries above.

[After Blaise Pascal.]
American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, Fifth Edition. Copyright © 2016 by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. All rights reserved.

Pascal's triangle

n
(Mathematics) a triangle consisting of rows of numbers; the apex is 1 and each row starts and ends with 1, other numbers being obtained by adding together the two numbers on either side in the row above: used to calculate probabilities
[C17: named after Blaise Pascal]
Collins English Dictionary – Complete and Unabridged, 12th Edition 2014 © HarperCollins Publishers 1991, 1994, 1998, 2000, 2003, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2011, 2014
References in periodicals archive ?
In the lost work, Khayyam discusses the Pascal triangle but he was not the first to do so since al-Karaji discussed the Pascal triangle before this date.
Finally, let me just mention that what would be called the "Gaussian curve" was actually another way of applying the famous Pascal triangle. Indeed, Pascal can be considered the father of the mathematical theory of probability and combinatorial analysis.
The columns are the Pascal triangle numbers, while adding the diagonals from left to right produces the Fibonacci numbers.