Passchendaele

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Related to Passchendale: Battle of Passchendaele

Passchendaele

(ˈpæʃənˌdeɪl)
n
(Placename) a village in NW Belgium, in West Flanders province: the scene of heavy fighting during the third battle of Ypres in World War I during which 245 000 British troops were lost
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References in periodicals archive ?
He was wounded at Passchendale and then shook the British establishment in 1907 when he won the Colne Valley by-election as a socialist at the age of just 25.
Members of the 16th Canadian Machine Gun Company holding the line at Passchendale during the Third Battle of Ypres.
Ernest Rollings was a brave man who was awarded one Military Cross following the Battle of Passchendale in 1917 and another Military Cross for his actions in 1918.
Joseph Smith, 80, from St Mellons, wanted to be a part of the memorial to pay his respects to his father, Sydney George Smith, and his uncle, Cornelius Smith, who was killed aged just 21 at Passchendale.
This year's service was especially poignant as it focused on the 100th anniversary of the Battle of Passchendale.
This has included children from local schools taking part in an art competition to commemorate the Somme and a poetry competition to mark the Battle of Passchendale.
This Australian soldier's skull has extensive damage caused by bullet wounds sustained in the Battle of Passchendale (or Third Ypres, Battle of Polygon Wood) in the First World War.
On October 4, 1917, during the advance on the villages of Poelcapelle and Passchendale, Hutt was part of a platoon decimated during heavy fighting.
TA century has passed since Sir Douglas Haig was appointed Commander-in-Chief of the British Expeditionary Force, but controversy still rages about the man who led our troops into the slaughter of Verdun, Passchendale and The Somme.
Shearings' Ostend Inclusive & Battlefields' tour takes in Passchendale, the site of some of WWI's bloodiest battles, and a visit to the Cemetery where John McCrae wrote the poem In Flanders Field.
He was wounded again during the Battle of Passchendale in November 1917 before an almost unparalleled burst of heroics by a single soldier saw Tandey win the three highest awards for bravery in only six weeks - a Distinguished Conduct Medal, a Military Medal and bar, and finally a Victoria Cross.
He was killed during the Battle of Passchendale and posthumously awarded the bard's chair, known as the Black chair at the 1917 National Eisteddfod.