passus


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passus

(ˈpæsəs)
n, pl -sus or -suses
(Literary & Literary Critical Terms) (esp in medieval literature) a division or section of a poem, story, etc
[C16: from Latin: step, pace1]
References in classic literature ?
Recordare Jesu pie Quod sum causa tuar viae Ne me perdas, illa die Querens me sedisti lassus Redemisti crucem passus Tantus laor non sit cassus.
Blum's southward pilgrimage in Passus 1 recall's Goethe's Italian Journey, and he acknowledged that the whole conception of the "beneficent south" ("die weldadige suide": Blum, Briewe 184) was Goethean.
In the Clarinet Quintet, toccata style, passus duriusculus, and canon all appear in a structural complex that bases parts of the first movement on the Gavotte, the second on the Sarabande and the third and fourth movements on variations of the Sarabande's second movement.
If the suffering of the divine goat of classical culture shown in the "goat song"--that is, in tragedy turns in the Middle Ages into the drama performed in the Passion of Christ, Valverde de Lucerna, a "villa feudal y medieval" (120), becomes the general stage where the redeeming new passion (from the Latin passus, "sufrimiento") reenacted by don Manuel takes place.
The Latin of the Nicene Creed says passus et sepultus est.
Where a pianissimo was required it provided a welcome respite to the busyness of much of this work: the Passus section of the Credo was one such magical moment, as was the first part of the Agnus Dei.
11) Notum enim sit paternitati vestrae, quia, postquam indigno mihi mandastis in provincia Francorum, sicut et ipsi rogaverunt, sacerdotali concilio et sinodali conventui praeesse, multas iniurias et persecutiones passus sum, maxime semper a falsis sacerdotibus, ab adulteratis presbiteris seu diaconibus et fornicariis elericis.
Other liturgical texts include a passage from the Credo of the Mass ending the fourth movement when Christ is condemned, "Cruxifixus etiam pro nobis; sub Pontil Pilato passus et sepultus est," ("He was crucified for us; He suffered under Pontius Pilate and was buried").
Pilgrimage was part of the sacrament of penance--a variety of the bodily suffering that could constitute fulfilment of the obligations of satisfactio operis--while also being equated symbolically with the whole penitential process, made up of a lifelong, iterable, journey-like series of gradus or passus.
Another example of liminality comes to the fore in the figure of Charon, the ferryman whom Virgil has also made mention of in Georgics IV: "nor did the ferryman of Orcus (grant) further passage through that barrier-like marsh" ("nec portitor Orci/ amplius obiectam passus transire paludem" (lines 502-03).
Provenant du latin passus, le mot << passage >> designe un deplacement, un processus de transformation en train de se faire, qui n'est pas termine.
For particular crises, one could start with the 14th century and Langland's conflicted late diatribe against the glut of friars (in Passus XX B-text, lines 252 ff.