Pastoral Epistles


Also found in: Encyclopedia, Wikipedia.
Related to Pastoral Epistles: Catholic Epistles, General epistles

Pastoral Epistles

n. Bible
The three New Testament Epistles, two addressed to Timothy and one to Titus, that are attributed to Saint Paul and largely concern church organization and standards of Christian behavior.
References in periodicals archive ?
Pervo is the first-ever gathering of the Pastoral Epistles and Polycarp to the Philippians under a single cover and moves beyond traditional debates about Pauline authorship to address specific second-century themes, such as combining the traditional Roman Household Code with the emerging Church Order, the corrosive effects of greed, and the price worth paying for unity.
T., <<The Mediator: 1 Timothy 2:5-6>>, en Idem, Studies in the Pastoral Epistles, Eugene: Wipf and Stock, 2015, 56-64 (reimpresion de London: SPCK, 1968).
Timo Glaser, "Telling What's Beyond the Known: The Epistolary Novel and the Afterlife of the Apostle Paul in the Pastoral Epistles" (203-213), treats the Pastoral Epistles as an epistolary novel, a literary genre whose contours have been delineated especially by Niklas Holzberg.
Among the topics are the task and method of exegesis, medical imagery in the pastoral epistles, whether the Thessalonians wrote to Paul, traditions and theology of care in the New Testament, paranaesis in the Epistle to Titus, the vertus feminarium in 1 Timothy 2:9-15, self-definition among the cynics, Heracles, Athenagoras on the poets and philosophers, a physical description of Paul, and a review of Helmut Koester's Introduction to the New Testament.
Theodore's comments on the pastoral epistles show him bringing the concerns of a bishop to the text, and, perhaps even more interestingly, give readers a glimpse of how he might have fulfilled the duties of that office on a personal and practical level.
The second section explores the development of thinking about ministry within the first century, particularly in the Pastoral Epistles, and concludes that replacing talk about clergy and laity with talk about the duality community/ministries is supported by NT evidence and, says F., is "binding for the whole of the Church today" (93).
Some years later, the churches of the Pastoral Epistles seem to have had a single episkopos, now a bishop (1 Timothy 3:1; Titus 1:7), with deacons as assistants.
His treatment of the text manifests a broad engagement with recent discussions of issues raised in and about the pastoral epistles. But this depth of engagement is presented in such a way that it never impedes accessibility.
Titus 2:11-14 brings the theology of the Pastoral Epistles to the Christmas story.
Then you must ignore evidence that the "pastoral epistles" (1 and 2 Timothy and Titus) were written in honor of Paul long after he died and reflect a second-century debate over women's roles in the church--whether to conform to social customs for the sake of winning converts, or to advocate radical social equality (and often celibacy) in the last days before the Second Coming.
Paul's further concern for the continuation of his mission, described in the Pastoral Epistles and confirmed by the Gospels, is echoed in another primitive text, 1 Clement 44: