patent office

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patent office

n.
A government bureau that grants applications for patents.
American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, Fifth Edition. Copyright © 2016 by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. All rights reserved.

Patent Office

(ˈpætənt)
n
1. (Government, Politics & Diplomacy) a government department that issues patents. Abbreviation: Pat. Off
2. (Law) a government department that issues patents. Abbreviation: Pat. Off
Collins English Dictionary – Complete and Unabridged, 12th Edition 2014 © HarperCollins Publishers 1991, 1994, 1998, 2000, 2003, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2011, 2014
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.Patent Office - the government bureau in the Department of Commerce that keeps a record of patents and trademarks and grants new onesPatent Office - the government bureau in the Department of Commerce that keeps a record of patents and trademarks and grants new ones
Commerce Department, Department of Commerce, DoC, Commerce - the United States federal department that promotes and administers domestic and foreign trade (including management of the census and the patent office); created in 1913
bureau, federal agency, government agency, agency, office, authority - an administrative unit of government; "the Central Intelligence Agency"; "the Census Bureau"; "Office of Management and Budget"; "Tennessee Valley Authority"
Based on WordNet 3.0, Farlex clipart collection. © 2003-2012 Princeton University, Farlex Inc.
Translations

Patent Office

n the Patent Officel'ufficio brevetti
Collins Italian Dictionary 1st Edition © HarperCollins Publishers 1995
References in periodicals archive ?
PAT. OFF. SOC'Y 363, 380 (1972) (summarizing the inequitable conduct test as containing materiality, intent, and reliance elements, but noting a trend toward striking down patents for intentional fraud irrespective of materiality, and noting that evidence of recklessness might suffice to establish the "intent" element); see also SULLIVAN, supra note 1, at 513 n.
PAT. OFF. SOC'Y 596, 603 (1967) ("What was formerly a shield, the defense of fraudulent procurement, may have been turned into a sword ...").
PAT. OFF. SOC'Y 3, 4 (1970) (noting that "strong evidence" of bad faith had been required in cases to that point and observing that mere invalidity based on the technicalities "[o]bviousness and prior art" had not yet been successfully asserted as a foundation for Walker Process claims).