pathogen

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path·o·gen

 (păth′ə-jən)
n.
An agent that causes disease, especially a virus, bacterium, or fungus.
American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, Fifth Edition. Copyright © 2016 by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. All rights reserved.

pathogen

(ˈpæθəˌdʒɛn) or

pathogene

n
(Pathology) any agent that can cause disease
Collins English Dictionary – Complete and Unabridged, 12th Edition 2014 © HarperCollins Publishers 1991, 1994, 1998, 2000, 2003, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2011, 2014

path•o•gen

(ˈpæθ ə dʒən, -ˌdʒɛn)

n.
any disease-producing agent, esp. a virus, bacterium, or other microorganism.
[1940–45]
Random House Kernerman Webster's College Dictionary, © 2010 K Dictionaries Ltd. Copyright 2005, 1997, 1991 by Random House, Inc. All rights reserved.

path·o·gen

(păth′ə-jən)
An agent that causes infection or disease, especially a microorganism, such as a bacterium or protozoan, or a virus. See Note at germ.
The American Heritage® Student Science Dictionary, Second Edition. Copyright © 2014 by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. All rights reserved.

pathogen

A disease-producing microorganism.
Dictionary of Military and Associated Terms. US Department of Defense 2005.

pathogen

1. A disease-causing organism.
2. A microorganism that causes disease.
Dictionary of Unfamiliar Words by Diagram Group Copyright © 2008 by Diagram Visual Information Limited
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.pathogen - any disease-producing agent (especially a virus or bacterium or other microorganism)
microorganism, micro-organism - any organism of microscopic size
infectious agent, infective agent - an agent capable of producing infection
Based on WordNet 3.0, Farlex clipart collection. © 2003-2012 Princeton University, Farlex Inc.
Translations
patogeenitaudinaiheuttaja

pathogen

[ˈpæθəʊdʒen] Npatógeno m
Collins Spanish Dictionary - Complete and Unabridged 8th Edition 2005 © William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1971, 1988 © HarperCollins Publishers 1992, 1993, 1996, 1997, 2000, 2003, 2005

pathogen

[ˈpæθədʒɛn] nagent m pathogène
Collins English/French Electronic Resource. © HarperCollins Publishers 2005

pathogen

n (Med) → Krankheitserreger m
Collins German Dictionary – Complete and Unabridged 7th Edition 2005. © William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1980 © HarperCollins Publishers 1991, 1997, 1999, 2004, 2005, 2007

pathogen

[ˈpæθəˌdʒɛn] nagente m patogeno
Collins Italian Dictionary 1st Edition © HarperCollins Publishers 1995

path·o·gen

n. patógeno, agente capaz de producir una enfermedad.
English-Spanish Medical Dictionary © Farlex 2012

pathogen

n patógeno, agente patógeno
English-Spanish/Spanish-English Medical Dictionary Copyright © 2006 by The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc. All rights reserved.
References in periodicals archive ?
Summary: Washington DC, [USA] Oct 11 (ANI): For the first time ever a vaccine has been designed to stop three common pathogens of traveller's diarrhoea.
THURSDAY, June 7, 2018 (HealthDay News) -- Respiratory pathogens are associated with increased risk of treatment failure in children with asthma exacerbations, according to a study published online June 4 in Pediatrics.
Trichomonas, Salmonella, and Listeria all are pathogens known to infect birds, but their infection rates in wild bird populations are not well documented.
"Vector-Mediated Transmission of Plant Pathogens" spans the disciplines of plant pathology, virology, bacteriology, mycology, entomology, and ecology.
The potential for a given field to produce an acceptable yield depends not only on physical and chemical characteristics of the soil but also, critically, on the presence or absence of soil dwelling pathogens that can infect strawberry roots and cause diseases that limit fruit production.
Such misuse of antibiotics is creating drug-resistant pathogens. According to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC), "Each year in the United States, at least two million people become infected with bacteria that are resistant to antibiotics, and at least 23,000 people die each year as a direct result of these infections." (3)
Alternative functional roles of mycorrhizae include the uptake of other nutrients, improving water relations, reducing the uptake of heavy metals, and in altering plant interactions with biotic components of the environment such as soil invertebrates (Borowicz, 2001; Gange and Brown, 2002), insects (Gehring and Whitham, 2002; Gehring and Bennett, 2009) and fungal pathogens (Dehne, 1982; Borowicz, 2001).
Health science company Luminex (NasdaqGS:LMNX) reported on Friday the receipt of the US FDA clearance for its NxTAG Respiratory Pathogen Panel that detects 20 clinically relevant viral and bacterial respiratory pathogens, including the atypical bacteria Chlamydophila pneumoniae and Mycoplasma pneumonia.
Written and edited by professionals in the field, Human Fungal Pathogens reviews the biology and diseases of fungal pathogens.
Additional thermal processing for 1 minute to 3 minutes, immediately before or after the final packaging is in place, can reduce or eliminate surface pathogens and significantly reduce the risk to consumers.
Zephyr detects foodborne pathogens such as salmonella, e.coli, listeria and campylobacter in dry foods, meats and on food preparation surfaces; significant issues for food producers worldwide.