pathopoeia


Also found in: Wikipedia.

pathopoeia

a speech, figure of speech, or rhetorical device aimed to stimulate the passions.
See also: Rhetoric and Rhetorical Devices
-Ologies & -Isms. Copyright 2008 The Gale Group, Inc. All rights reserved.
References in periodicals archive ?
In other comparable definitions of figures dealing with the imitation of people, such as prosopopoeia, ethopoeia, or pathopoeia, the mimetic appeal of the figures had been underlined.
By contrast, despite his interest in the way affections are expressed through ethopoeia and pathopoeia, in Sherry there is no allusion to the correspondence between outward signs and inwardness and to how the former work as indices to the latter.
This essay will first focus on their efforts to address this aporia, then analyze their use of several tropes to make atheist arguments more attractive: paralepsis; the sarcasm cluster (apodioxis, tapinosis, diasyrmus); pathopoeia; and the linked tropes of catachresis and metalepsis.
Pathopoeia adds a dimension to their rhetoric that is more serious, moving, and (usually) quite personal.
He writes of "Pathopoeia and the Protestant Form of Donne's Devotions" with the hope of accounting for "audience orientation" and "emotional appeal" (pathopoeic, or pathos).
"Passion is speaking," this prosopopeia lurks behind the criticism of the "new rhetoricians," making it (to use a term revived by recent criticism), a pathopoeia. (32) And the same figure becomes even more powerful in some of Coleridge's readings of Shakespeare when--as we shall see--he acknowledges the voice of passion even where earlier critics had considered it silent.
Sellin, "'Souldiers of one Army': John Donne and the Army of the States General as an International Protestant Crossroads, 1595-1625"; Catherine Gimelli Martin, "Unmeete Contraryes: The Reformed Subject and the Triangulation of Religious Desire in Donne's Anniversaries and Holy Sonnets"; Chanita Goodblatt, "From 'Tav' to the Cross: John Donne's Protestant Exegesis and Polemics"; Brent Nelson, "Pathopoeia and the Protestand From of Donne's Devotions Upon Emergent Occasions"; Elena Levy-Navarro, "Breaking Down the Walls That Divide: Anti-Polemicism in the Devotions Upon Emergent Occasions"; Annette Deschner, "Reforming Baptism: John Donne and Continental Irenicism"; Marina Salenius, "True Purification: Donne's Art of Rhetoric in Two Candlemas Sermons"; and Gale H.
(25) Witness Montaigne's pathopoeia in "De la phisionomie": "Monstrueuse guerre: les autres agissent au dehors; cette-cy encore contre soy se ronge et se desfaict par son propre venin" (1041b) ("Monstrous war!
The highly expressive nature of these two movements arises in part from a repetition of certain intervals "of the type sometimes found in discussion of [such] musico-rhetorical figures as pathopoeia (affective minor seconds) and saltus duriusculus (larger chromatic intervals)" (p.
Devices related to the appeal to emotions include cohortatio, commiseratio, indignatio, excuscitatio, pathopoeia.
Largely derived from rhetorical theory (probably from Melanchthon, via Lucas Lossius), terms such as hypallage, hypotyposis, parrhesia, pathopoeia, and syncope are used to describe musical procedures, not always in a way one would expect from the rhetorical analogue (indeed, in some cases Burmeister even changed his mind between treatises).
Harmony and other contextual elements make certain half-steps expressive, but it does not follow that the half-step in the main theme of the Art of Fugue is in itself an instance of pathopoeia. Eggebrecht nevertheless proceeds from such equations to his central claim that the four-note BACH motive is Bach's declaration of his presence in the work, and that its continuation through the leading tone C[sharp] to the tonic D represents Bach's personal striving toward Sein (represented by the diatonic first subject of the quadruple fugue).