analgesia

(redirected from Patient-controlled analgesia)
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an·al·ge·si·a

 (ăn′əl-jē′zē-ə, -zhə)
n.
A deadening or absence of the sense of pain without loss of consciousness.

[Greek analgēsiā : an-, without; see a-1 + algēsiā, pain (from algein, to feel pain, from algos, pain).]

an′al·get′ic (-jĕt′ĭk) adj.

analgesia

(ˌænəlˈdʒiːzɪə; -sɪə) or

analgia

n
1. (Medicine) inability to feel pain
2. (Medicine) the relief of pain
[C18: via New Latin from Greek: insensibility, from an- + algēsis sense of pain]

an•al•ge•si•a

(ˌæn lˈdʒi zi ə, -si ə)

n.
absence of sense of pain.
[1700–10; < New Latin < Greek analgēsía painlessness <análgēt(os) without pain (an- an-1 + -algētos, v. adj. of algeîn to suffer, álgos pain)]

analgesia, analgesy

the absence of pain. — analgesic, analgetic, adj.
See also: Health
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.analgesia - absence of the sense of pain without loss of consciousnessanalgesia - absence of the sense of pain without loss of consciousness
physical condition, physiological condition, physiological state - the condition or state of the body or bodily functions
Translations

analgesia

[ˌænælˈdʒiːzɪə] Nanalgesia f

analgesia

nSchmerzlosigkeit f, → Analgesie f (spec)

analgesia

n analgesia, supresión f de sensación dolorosa en el paciente consciente; patient-controlled — analgesia controlada por el paciente
References in periodicals archive ?
The addition of spinal analgesia to a routine walking epidural patient-controlled analgesia regimen shortened the time to pain relief in a randomized study.
Patient-controlled analgesia (PCA) therapy is frequently used as an alternative to conventional intramuscular (IM) therapy in managing acute postoperative pain.
The patients were randomized into groups--they all received ON-Q PainBuster with the unique ON-Q Soaker Catheter, some with continuous local anesthetic infusion and others with a placebo, and they all also had treatment for pain available with patient-controlled analgesia (narcotics).
Eric-Paul Paques, Grunenthal's CEO,"We are extremely pleased to enter into this collaboration with AcelRx and its proven concept of a patient-controlled analgesia system to address a significant unmet medical need, thereby allowing hospitals to avoid the challenges of intravenous line-related infections, as well as freeing hospital personnel from the need to program intravenous infusion pump systems.
Incline Therapeutics Inc is focused on the development of IONSYS (fentanyl iontophoretic transdermal system), a compact, disposable, needleless Patient-Controlled Analgesia (PCA) system in development for the short-term management of acute postoperative pain in the hospital setting.
In the solutions to these problems, patient-controlled analgesia surely has more than 25 years of worldwide and safe usage (2008 estimate usage in the UK >900,000) (15,000 per million population) (2,3) and surely should be mentioned?
And effective pain control, as measured by successful patient-controlled analgesia attempts (74% vs.
NYSE:AMI), developer of products for the safe delivery of intravenous (IV) medications, announced today the limited release of the Medley(TM) Patient-Controlled Analgesia (PCA) Module with the Guardrails(R) Safety Software at Adventist Medical Center in Portland.
The ARX-01 Phase 3 programme is comprised of three studies, namely a placebo-controlled post-operative pain study following major abdominal surgery, a placebo-controlled study in patients after major orthopaedic surgery and an active comparator study comparing the Sufentanil NanoTab PCA System to intravenous morphine patient-controlled analgesia in post-operative patients.
Postoperative analgesia was provided by morphine IV patient-controlled analgesia with demand bolus 1 mg, lockout interval five minutes and maximum hourly limit 10 mg.
Nine percent of the women who received epidurals developed hypotension requiring treatment with ephedrine, compared with none of the women who used patient-controlled analgesia.
The ON-Q patients actually required less than half the amount of narcotics and many did not even require the use of patient-controlled analgesia with morphine.

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