patriate


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Related to patriate: expatriate

patriate

(ˈpætrɪˌeɪt; ˈpeɪtrɪˌeɪt)
vb (tr)
to bring under the authority of an autonomous country, for example as in the transfer of the Canadian constitution from UK to Canadian responsibility
ˌpatriˈation n

pa•tri•ate

(ˈpeɪ triˌeɪt; esp. Brit. ˈpæ-)
v.t. -at•ed, -at•ing. Canadian.
to transfer (legislation) to the authority of an autonomous country from its previous mother country.
[1965–70; back formation from repatriate]
pa`tri•a′tion, n.
References in periodicals archive ?
On October 1, 1980, the day before he planned to make public his intention to patriate the Constitution without the approval of the provinces, Trudeau had a lengthy conversation with Ed Broadbent.
This gap, in fact, became the main stimulus for Canada's decades-long efforts to patriate its constitution.
Its characters and plot are well-known: the charismatic Prime Minister Pierre Trudeau, determined to entrench constitutional protection of language rights; the acrimonious battle between the federal and provincial governments; the federal attempt to patriate the constitution unilaterally; the late-night drafting of the "Kitchen Accord", which, in Quebec, has become known as the "Night of the Long Knives".
Davis supported Prime Minister Trudeau's plan to patriate the Constitution in 1981.
On constitutional issues his court ruled on Trudeau's move to patriate the constitution unilaterally without the provinces.
During closed debate among the provincial premiers and the prime minister to patriate the Canadian Constitution, former premier David Peterson of Ontario informed the press that writing the constitution was like making sausages--not something the public would enjoy witnessing first-hand.
Bourassa had been a leader in forming a common front of provincial opposition to Prime Minister Trudeau's plans to patriate (bring home) the Constitution.
The Supreme Court facilitated this attempt by ruling, in The Patriation Reference [1981], that only a "substantial degree" of provincial consent was required to patriate the constitution and bind the governments of Canada to abide by the Charter.
Although legally Trudeau could have gone ahead and asked Britain to patriate Canada's constitution on his terms, he did not at that time feel sufficiently strong nor impatient enough to impose a constitutional settlement on Quebec.
Shortly after that conference failed to achieve its objectives, Prime Minister Trudeau announced that he would be going to Great Britain with a package of constitutional changes that would patriate the Constitution to Canada.
This high degree of consensus was a truly remarkable achievement which enabled our long-suffering nation (on the constitutional front) to at long last patriate our Constitution and, at the same time, enshrine protection of fundamental rights and freedoms.