Patroclus


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Related to Patroclus: Odysseus, Briseis

Pa·tro·clus

 (pə-trō′kləs)
n. Greek Mythology
A Greek warrior, attendant, and friend to Achilles, killed by Hector in the Trojan War.

Patroclus

(pəˈtrɒkləs)
n
(Classical Myth & Legend) Greek myth a friend of Achilles, killed in the Trojan War by Hector. His death made Achilles return to the fight after his quarrel with Agamemnon

Pa•tro•clus

(pəˈtroʊ kləs)

n.
a friend of Achilles, slain by Hector at Troy.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.Patroclus - (Greek mythology) a friend of Achilles who was killed in the Trojan WarPatroclus - (Greek mythology) a friend of Achilles who was killed in the Trojan War; his death led Achilles to return to the fight after his quarrel with Agamemnon
Greek mythology - the mythology of the ancient Greeks
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References in classic literature ?
Whereas, upon your view, the heroes who fell at Troy were not good for much, and the son of Thetis above all, who altogether despised danger in comparison with disgrace; and when he was so eager to slay Hector, his goddess mother said to him, that if he avenged his companion Patroclus, and slew Hector, he would die himself--'Fate,' she said, in these or the like words, 'waits for you next after Hector;' he, receiving this warning, utterly despised danger and death, and instead of fearing them, feared rather to live in dishonour, and not to avenge his friend.
Our best men all of them fell there--Ajax, Achilles, Patroclus peer of gods in counsel, and my own dear son Antilochus, a man singularly fleet of foot and in fight valiant.
Therefore, Patroclus, bring her and give her to them, but let them be witnesses by the blessed gods, by mortal men, and by the fierceness of Agamemnon's anger, that if ever again there be need of me to save the people from ruin, they shall seek and they shall not find.
In fact, Bazin bounded up, carrying with him his little low chair, which the children tried to take away, with battles more fierce than those of the Greeks endeavoring to recover the body of Patroclus from the hands of the Trojans.
Croiset remark, the abusive Thersites in the "Aethiopis" is clearly copied from the Thersites of the "Iliad"; in the same poem Antilochus, slain by Memnon and avenged by Achilles, is obviously modelled on Patroclus.
Some priest who could pronounce the Greek itself taught him to read his verse in the Testament in his native parish far away; and now I must translate to him, while he holds the book, Achilles' reproof to Patroclus for his sad countenance.
Why are you in tears, Patroclus, like a young girl?
Woe is me that I am fated to have Sarpedon, dearest of men to me, subdued at the hands of Patroclus the son of Menoetius.
The enormous abstract depiction of Greek mythological heroes Achilles and Patroclus is rendered in fresco tempura and towers over its viewer at 59" x 110".
Achilles makes this statement to Hector after mortally wounding him to avenge his friend, Patroclus, whom Hector had killed while Patroclus wore Achilles's armor.
In the Iliad, Achilles ritually sacrifices twelve Trojan youths in honor of his fallen friend Patroclus, but Agamemnon's murder by his wife Clytemnestra was seen by later Greeks, at least in part, as a punishment for his having sacrificed his daughter Iphigeneia to the goddess Artemis.
Mourning the death of Patroclus at the hands of Hector, Achilles admits that his impotence, his dwelling apart in his tent, is powerful proof that he has been poisoned by ressentiment: