Signac

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Si·gnac

 (sēn-yäk′), Paul 1863-1935.
French neoimpressionist painter. He painted mainly landscapes and marine views, often employing pointillist techniques.

Signac

(French siɲak)
n
(Biography) Paul (pɔl). 1863–1935, French neoimpressionist painter, influenced by Seurat
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Paul Signac's dazzling, sun-drenched --and exceptional--pointillist Le Port au soleil couchant, Opus 236 (Saint-Tropez) of 1892, illustrated on these pages in February, sold above its estimate to set a world auction record for the artist at 19.8m [pounds sterling].
His time-consuming painting technique was first employed in the 1880s by the French painters Georges Seurat and Paul Signac.
Unlike Paul Signac or Georges Seurat, Klimt did not break the picture down into bits of bright color.
Further landscapes in the NGS exhibit (like Paul Signac's 'The Red Buoy, '1895) illustrate the movement toward 'Neo-Impressionism.' While the initial movement played around with free brushstrokes, the later development aimed at 'a modern synthesis of methods based on science,' Perrin said.
In his biography, Naifeh argues that witnesses who saw van Gogh after Rey, including his brother Theo's wife, Johanna van Gogh-Bonger, the artist Paul Signac and van Gogh's doctor in Auvers-sur-Oise, Dr Paul Gachet, said that the entire ear was not missing.
There is a colored mass for each object, variously reflected on either side." These realizations will later be developed into theories on light and the division of colors in painting -- the very theories that Paul Signac will channel as the founding principles of Impressionism in his book D'Eugene Delacroix au neo-Impressionisme (1911).
The venture is named after the French painter Paul Signac, who helped invent pointillism, the technique of using small dots of color to form an image visible at a distance.
Para mi no cabe la menor duda: Valle-Inclan conocia el contenido del manifiesto del puntillismo, D'Eugene Delacroix aux neo-impressionnistes debido a Paul Signac, un texto particularmente significativo para las vanguardias de la Europa del primer cuarto del siglo XX.
Similarly, two prominent tree branches in Paul Signac's neo-impressionistic "Golfe Juan'' find a counterpart in Beverly McClure's imaginative design in relation to the painting.
The technique, which branches from Impressionism and was developed by Georges Seurat and Paul Signac in 1886, sees small, distinct dots of colour applied in patterns to form an image.