pauper

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pau·per

 (pô′pər)
n.
1. One who is extremely poor.
2. One living on or eligible for public charity.

[From Latin, poor; see pau- in Indo-European roots.]
American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, Fifth Edition. Copyright © 2016 by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. All rights reserved.

pauper

(ˈpɔːpə)
n
1. a person who is extremely poor
2. (Historical Terms) (formerly) a destitute person supported by public charity
[C16: from Latin: poor]
ˈpauperˌism n
Collins English Dictionary – Complete and Unabridged, 12th Edition 2014 © HarperCollins Publishers 1991, 1994, 1998, 2000, 2003, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2011, 2014

pau•per

(ˈpɔ pər)

n.
1. a person without any personal means of support.
2. a very poor person.
[1485–95; < Latin: poor]
Random House Kernerman Webster's College Dictionary, © 2010 K Dictionaries Ltd. Copyright 2005, 1997, 1991 by Random House, Inc. All rights reserved.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.pauper - a person who is very poorpauper - a person who is very poor    
beggar, mendicant - a pauper who lives by begging
derelict - a person without a home, job, or property
have-not, poor person - a person with few or no possessions
starveling - someone who is starving (or being starved)
Based on WordNet 3.0, Farlex clipart collection. © 2003-2012 Princeton University, Farlex Inc.

pauper

Collins Thesaurus of the English Language – Complete and Unabridged 2nd Edition. 2002 © HarperCollins Publishers 1995, 2002

pauper

noun
An impoverished person:
The American Heritage® Roget's Thesaurus. Copyright © 2013, 2014 by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. All rights reserved.
Translations
فَقير جدا
-čkanuzákžebrák
subsistensløs
fátæklingur; ölmusumaîur
beturtis
nabagsubags
bedár
çok yoksul kimse

pauper

[ˈpɔːpəʳ] Npobre mf, indigente mf
pauper's gravefosa f común
Collins Spanish Dictionary - Complete and Unabridged 8th Edition 2005 © William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1971, 1988 © HarperCollins Publishers 1992, 1993, 1996, 1997, 2000, 2003, 2005

pauper

[ˈpɔːpər] nindigent(e) m/f pauper's gravepauper's grave nfosse f commune
Collins English/French Electronic Resource. © HarperCollins Publishers 2005

pauper

nArme(r) mf; (supported by charity) → Almosenempfänger(in) m(f); pauper’s graveArmengrab nt
Collins German Dictionary – Complete and Unabridged 7th Edition 2005. © William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1980 © HarperCollins Publishers 1991, 1997, 1999, 2004, 2005, 2007

pauper

[ˈpɔːpəʳ] nindigente m/f
pauper's grave → fossa comune
Collins Italian Dictionary 1st Edition © HarperCollins Publishers 1995

pauper

(ˈpoːpə) noun
a very poor person. Her husband died a pauper.
Kernerman English Multilingual Dictionary © 2006-2013 K Dictionaries Ltd.
References in classic literature ?
Clearly then, whenever you see paupers in a State, somewhere in that neighborhood there are hidden away thieves, and cutpurses and robbers of temples, and all sorts of malefactors.
In that branch of it, which is devoted to the reception of old or otherwise helpless paupers, these words are painted on the walls: 'WORTHY OF NOTICE.
He had to pass a poor, mean burial-ground--a dismal place, raised a few feet above the level of the street, and parted from it by a low parapet-wall and an iron railing; a rank, unwholesome, rotten spot, where the very grass and weeds seemed, in their frouzy growth, to tell that they had sprung from paupers' bodies, and had struck their roots in the graves of men, sodden, while alive, in steaming courts and drunken hungry dens.
His estates were confiscated, his personal property seized, and there we were, in Germany, strangers, friendless, and in fact paupers. My brother and I were ten years old, and well educated for that age, very studious, very fond of our books, and well grounded in the German, French, Spanish, and English languages.
Through this crowd of paupers and beggars, a beautiful coach passed now and again.
Old women, such as I, starve and shiver, or accept the pauper's dole and the pauper's shroud.
"But, my dear fellow, in that case, why didn't you get him a pauper's funeral?
The play of some led to steam yachts and mansions; of others, to the asylum or the pauper's ward.
"So far as in me lies," says he, "I will give you pleasure." True, he is a pauper, and nothing but a pauper; but, at least he is an HONOURABLE pauper.
This boastful handiwork of ours, which fails in its terrors for the professional pauper, the sturdy breaker of windows and the rampant tearer of clothes, strikes with a cruel and a wicked stab at the stricken sufferer, and is a horror to the deserving and unfortunate.
"No pauper Asylum," I said, "I won't have her put in a pauper Asylum.
A pauper's meal, my dear girl -- seasoned with a gentleman's welcome."