Pavo cristatus


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Noun1.Pavo cristatus - peafowl of India and CeylonPavo cristatus - peafowl of India and Ceylon    
bird of Juno, peafowl - very large terrestrial southeast Asian pheasant often raised as an ornamental bird
References in periodicals archive ?
IANS Bhopal After a two-year-long effort, a team of researchers from IISER-Bhopal has been able to sequence the genome of India's national bird, the peacock (Pavo cristatus).
Bhopal: After a two-year-long effort, a team of researchers from IISER-Bhopal has been able to sequence the genome of India's national bird, the peacock (Pavo cristatus).
Indian peafowl (Pavo cristatus Linn.) is cosmopolitan in distribution; however, India, Sri Lanka, Pakistan, Nepal, Burma and Congo are considered to be its nativehomeland (Ansari, 1957).
The pathologic and molecular findings associated with Histomonas meleagridis are described in a leucistic Indian peafowl (Pavo cristatus) from Southern Brazil.
In the present study, the hematological and serum biochemical parameters were determined to establish the reference values in the wild Indian blue peafowl (Pavo cristatus) of Thar (desert) region in the Sindh province of Pakistan.
Present study was carried out at Punjab Wildlife Research Institute Faisalabad to evaluate effect of cage sizes on reproductive performance of the Indian Peafowl (Pavo cristatus).
In Khyber Pakhtunkhwa, five colored mutants belonging to Pavo muticus and Pavo cristatus are found.
The state's administrative rules list peafowl - Latin name pavo cristatus - as nonwild animals, right in there with guinea pigs, hamsters, emus, alpacas, ostriches, dogs, cats, etc.
carbonaria Squamata Tupinambis teguixin Ancylostomatidae Aves 11 individuos Galliformes Pavo cristatus Strongyloides sp.
Peacock (Pavo cristatus), the National bird of India is an endangered bird species.
The Indian Peacock (Pavo cristatus) is the national bird of India, with almost 150 species having become extinct after the arrival of humans.
Already in 2007, Adeline Loyau and colleagues found that females of the Blue Peacock (Pavo cristatus) that had mated with attractive males increased the allocation of resources into their eggs compared to females that had mated with unattractive males.