Pax Romana

(redirected from Pax Augusta)
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Pax Romana

(ˈpæks rəʊˈmɑːnə)
n
(Historical Terms) the Roman peace; the long period of stability under the Roman Empire

Pax Ro•ma•na

(ˈpæks roʊˈmeɪ nə, -ˈmɑ-, ˈpɑks)
n.
the peace imposed by ancient Rome on its dominions.
[1880–85; < Latin: Roman peace]

Pax Romana

- An uneasy peace, as one imposed by a powerful state on a weaker or vanquished state.
See also related terms for imposed.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.Pax Romana - the Roman peace; the long period of peace enforced on states in the Roman Empire
peace - the state prevailing during the absence of war
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References in periodicals archive ?
While researching for biographies of generals in the Roman army of the first centuries BCE and CE, Powell was struck by the sheer number of military engagement during what historians call Pax Augusta and Pax Romana.
The mission of the Aeneid is for the Trojans to settle in Italy to become the proto-Roman society that will eventually produce Augustus, the pax Augusta, and a new golden age.
The Ara Pacis is a monument dating from 9 BC, commissioned by the Roman Senate as an altar in honor of the Pax Augusta, the peace brought about by Augustus's military successes and the supremacy of the Roman empire.