peculium


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peculium

(pɪˈkjuːlɪəm)
n
(Historical Terms) Roman law property that a father or master allowed his child or slave to hold as his own
[C17: from Latin; see peculiar]

peculium

Roman Law. property that might be held by a son, wife, or slave.
See also: Property and Ownership
References in classic literature ?
Freely's business, and he would be obliged to quit it without a peculium so desirable towards defraying the expense of moving.
Titled "Mikne Avram Peculium Abrae," the recovered volume is a grammar book published in both Hebrew and Latin in 1523.
They are considered not as the peculium of this or that nation, but as the property of mankind at large, and as belonging to the common interests of the whole species.
In The Subjection of Women, for example, Mill observed that "the wife's position under the common law of England is worse than that of slaves in the laws of many countries: by Roman law, for example, a slave might have his peculium," whereas in Victorian England, most women must suffer "the absorption of all rights, all property, as well as all freedom of action," upon marriage (pp.
Mahalia Way (2000, 204) explains this as a conflict between Lysidamus's legal ownership over his wife's peculium and Cleostrata's de facto authority over it.
In addition, slaves were permitted to accumulate a peculium, a fund that was technically the property of the master, but of which the slave could avail himself as if it were his, albeit according to the conditions stipulated by the master.
As the Romans at first used cattle for money, their word for cattle (pecus) has given rise to our pecuniary, and by a curious chain of circumstances also to peculiar, as the peculium was the private pocket-money of an individual.
For a description of the antecedents of the modern joint-stock company in Roman law--the slave-based peculium arrangement and the societas publicanorum, see Henry Hansmann, Reinier Kraakman & Richard Squire, Law and the Rise of the Firm, 119 HARV.
La forma alargada--iare pertenece propiamente a los verbos derivados de nombres en--i-,--io-: breviare de brevis, peculiare de peculium, ampliare formado, sin duda, del comparativo amplior; se extiende bastante en la epoca de transicion: acutiare (glos.
and peculium of our country, but it is liberty regulated by law; and the
En la Novella 104 "de praetore Siciliae" (gemela de la 75, "de appellationibus Siciliae"), del ano 537, al regular la jurisdiccion en apelacion contra las sentencias de los jueces sicilianos (97), Justiniano recuerda la especial consideracion que tuvo para la historia de Sicilia, al encargar de su administracion a un praetor, "secundum instar antiquitatis", y la especial union de Sicilia con la persona del emperador, del cual es considerada peculium (98).