pedlar

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ped·lar

 (pĕd′lər)
n. Chiefly British
Variant of peddler.
American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, Fifth Edition. Copyright © 2016 by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. All rights reserved.

pedlar

;

peddler

or

pedler

n
(Commerce) a person who peddles; hawker
[C14: changed from peder, from ped, pedde basket, of obscure origin]
Collins English Dictionary – Complete and Unabridged, 12th Edition 2014 © HarperCollins Publishers 1991, 1994, 1998, 2000, 2003, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2011, 2014

ped•dler

(ˈpɛd lər)

n.
1. a person who sells from door to door or in the street.
2. a person who tries to promote some cause, candidate, viewpoint, etc.
Sometimes, pedlar, pedler.
[1350–1400; Middle English pedlere, unexplained alter. of peder, derivative of ped(de) basket]
Random House Kernerman Webster's College Dictionary, © 2010 K Dictionaries Ltd. Copyright 2005, 1997, 1991 by Random House, Inc. All rights reserved.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.pedlar - someone who travels about selling his wares (as on the streets or at carnivals)pedlar - someone who travels about selling his wares (as on the streets or at carnivals)
chapman - archaic term for an itinerant peddler
cheapjack - a peddler of inferior goods
crier - a peddler who shouts to advertise the goods he sells
muffin man - formerly an itinerant peddler of muffins
sandboy - a young peddler of sand; used now only to express great happiness in `happy as a sandboy'
marketer, seller, trafficker, vender, vendor - someone who promotes or exchanges goods or services for money
transmigrante - a Latin American who buys used goods in the United States and takes them to Latin America to sell
Based on WordNet 3.0, Farlex clipart collection. © 2003-2012 Princeton University, Farlex Inc.

pedlar

see peddler
Collins Thesaurus of the English Language – Complete and Unabridged 2nd Edition. 2002 © HarperCollins Publishers 1995, 2002
Translations
بائِع مُتَجَوِّل
podomnípouliční obchodník
dørsælger
farandsali
işportacıseyyar satıcı

pedlar

[ˈpedləʳ] Nvendedor(a) m/f ambulante, buhonero (o.f.) m
Collins Spanish Dictionary - Complete and Unabridged 8th Edition 2005 © William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1971, 1988 © HarperCollins Publishers 1992, 1993, 1996, 1997, 2000, 2003, 2005

pedlar

nHausierer(in) m(f); (of drugs)Dealer(in) m(f) (inf)
Collins German Dictionary – Complete and Unabridged 7th Edition 2005. © William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1980 © HarperCollins Publishers 1991, 1997, 1999, 2004, 2005, 2007

pedlar

[ˈpɛdləʳ] nvenditore/trice ambulante; (of drugs) → spacciatore/trice
Collins Italian Dictionary 1st Edition © HarperCollins Publishers 1995

peddle

(ˈpedl) verb
to go from place to place or house to house selling (small objects). Gypsies often peddle (goods) from door to door.
ˈpedlar , (also, especially American) ˈpeddler noun
a person who peddles. I bought it from a pedlar.
Kernerman English Multilingual Dictionary © 2006-2013 K Dictionaries Ltd.
References in classic literature ?
He scoffed at them as adventures, mountebanks, sideshow riffraff, dime museum freaks; he assailed their showy titles with measureless derision; he said they were back-alley barbers disguised as nobilities, peanut peddlers masquerading as gentlemen, organ-grinders bereft of their brother monkey.
These were called coureurs des bois, rangers of the woods; originally men who had accompanied the Indians in their hunting expeditions, and made themselves acquainted with remote tracts and tribes; and who now became, as it were, peddlers of the wilderness.
"You would be amazed," says an old writer already quoted, "if you saw how lewd these peddlers are when they return; how they feast and game, and how prodigal they are, not only in their clothes, but upon their sweethearts.
What, perhaps, with other things, made Stubb such an easygoing, unfearing man, so cheerily trudging off with the burden of life in a world full of grave peddlers, all bowed to the ground with their packs; what helped to bring about that almost impious good-humor of his; that thing must have been his pipe.
And the winds of adventure blew the oyster pirate sloops up and down San Francisco Bay, from raided oyster-beds and fights at night on shoal and flat, to markets in the morning against city wharves, where peddlers and saloon-keepers came down to buy.
An old man named Daniel Baker, living near Lebanon, Iowa, was suspected by his neighbors of having murdered a peddler who had obtained permission to pass the night at his house.
The peddler with his pack traversed the country by all manner of lonely roads, and was compelled to rely upon the country people for hospitality.
Here I take this great basket, so; here I tie my rosary around the handle, thus; and here I slip the rosary over my head and sling the basket upon my back, in this wise." And Little John did according to his words, the basket hanging down behind him like a peddler's pack; then, giving his staff to one of the maids, and taking a basket upon either arm, he turned his face toward Tuxford Town and stepped forth merrily, a laughing maid on either side, and one walking ahead, carrying the staff.
In front of the door three merry fellows, a tinker, a peddler, and a beggar, were seated on a bench in the sun quaffing stout ale.
The peddler said it was warranted to dye any hair a beautiful raven black and wouldn't wash off.
They knew when I had my teeth out and a new set made; they knew when I put on a false front- piece; they knew when the fruit peddler asked me to be his third wife--I never told 'em, an' you can be sure HE never did, but they don't NEED to be told in this village; they have nothin' to do but guess, an' they'll guess right every time.
The Torzhok peddler woman, in a whining voice, went on offering her wares, especially a pair of goatskin slippers.