pedlar

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ped·lar

 (pĕd′lər)
n. Chiefly British
Variant of peddler.
American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, Fifth Edition. Copyright © 2016 by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. All rights reserved.

pedlar

;

peddler

or

pedler

n
(Commerce) a person who peddles; hawker
[C14: changed from peder, from ped, pedde basket, of obscure origin]
Collins English Dictionary – Complete and Unabridged, 12th Edition 2014 © HarperCollins Publishers 1991, 1994, 1998, 2000, 2003, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2011, 2014

ped•dler

(ˈpɛd lər)

n.
1. a person who sells from door to door or in the street.
2. a person who tries to promote some cause, candidate, viewpoint, etc.
Sometimes, pedlar, pedler.
[1350–1400; Middle English pedlere, unexplained alter. of peder, derivative of ped(de) basket]
Random House Kernerman Webster's College Dictionary, © 2010 K Dictionaries Ltd. Copyright 2005, 1997, 1991 by Random House, Inc. All rights reserved.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.pedlar - someone who travels about selling his wares (as on the streets or at carnivals)pedlar - someone who travels about selling his wares (as on the streets or at carnivals)
chapman - archaic term for an itinerant peddler
cheapjack - a peddler of inferior goods
crier - a peddler who shouts to advertise the goods he sells
muffin man - formerly an itinerant peddler of muffins
sandboy - a young peddler of sand; used now only to express great happiness in `happy as a sandboy'
marketer, seller, trafficker, vender, vendor - someone who promotes or exchanges goods or services for money
transmigrante - a Latin American who buys used goods in the United States and takes them to Latin America to sell
Based on WordNet 3.0, Farlex clipart collection. © 2003-2012 Princeton University, Farlex Inc.

pedlar

see peddler
Collins Thesaurus of the English Language – Complete and Unabridged 2nd Edition. 2002 © HarperCollins Publishers 1995, 2002
Translations
بائِع مُتَجَوِّل
podomnípouliční obchodník
dørsælger
farandsali
işportacıseyyar satıcı

pedlar

[ˈpedləʳ] Nvendedor(a) m/f ambulante, buhonero (o.f.) m
Collins Spanish Dictionary - Complete and Unabridged 8th Edition 2005 © William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1971, 1988 © HarperCollins Publishers 1992, 1993, 1996, 1997, 2000, 2003, 2005

pedlar

nHausierer(in) m(f); (of drugs)Dealer(in) m(f) (inf)
Collins German Dictionary – Complete and Unabridged 7th Edition 2005. © William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1980 © HarperCollins Publishers 1991, 1997, 1999, 2004, 2005, 2007

pedlar

[ˈpɛdləʳ] nvenditore/trice ambulante; (of drugs) → spacciatore/trice
Collins Italian Dictionary 1st Edition © HarperCollins Publishers 1995

peddle

(ˈpedl) verb
to go from place to place or house to house selling (small objects). Gypsies often peddle (goods) from door to door.
ˈpedlar , (also, especially American) ˈpeddler noun
a person who peddles. I bought it from a pedlar.
Kernerman English Multilingual Dictionary © 2006-2013 K Dictionaries Ltd.
References in classic literature ?
Jos having, in his pompous way, and with his clumsy German, made inquiries for the person of whom he was in search, was directed to the very top of the house, above the first-floor rooms where some travelling pedlars had lived, and were exhibiting their jewellery and brocades; above the second-floor apartments occupied by the etat major of the gambling firm; above the third-floor rooms, tenanted by the band of renowned Bohemian vaulters and tumblers; and so on to the little cabins of the roof, where, among students, bagmen, small tradesmen, and country-folks come in for the festival, Becky had found a little nest--as dirty a little refuge as ever beauty lay hid in.
She was at home with everybody in the place, pedlars, punters, tumblers, students and all.
I shall put them into a box and bury them in the garden; but take care that you never go near or meddle with them.' 'No, Frederick,' said she, 'that I never will.' As soon as he was gone, there came by some pedlars with earthenware plates and dishes, and they asked her whether she would buy.
The first seemed to be an assembly of heroes and demigods; the other, a knot of pedlars, pick-pockets, highwayman, and bullies.
Snell, the landlord--he being, as he observed, a man accustomed to put two and two together--to connect with the tinder-box, which, as deputy-constable, he himself had had the honourable distinction of finding, certain recollections of a pedlar who had called to drink at the house about a month before, and had actually stated that he carried a tinder-box about with him to light his pipe.
Snell was correct in his surmise, that somebody else would remember the pedlar's ear-rings.
A young fellow, a tobacco pedlar by trade, was on his way from Morristown, where he had dealt largely with the Deacon of the Shaker settlement, to the village of Parker's Falls, on Salmon River.
After an early breakfast at Morristown, the tobacco pedlar, whose name was Dominicus Pike, had travelled seven miles through a solitary piece of woods, without speaking a word to anybody but himself and his little gray mare.
I suppose I could have passed for a pedlar, but undoubtedly it would have been very embarrassing.
The pedlar's smile grew more ingratiating, though he understood no word of what Cronshaw said, and like a conjurer he produced a sandalwood box.
Of all deaths, I would truly like least to die by the gallows; and the picture of that uncanny instrument came into my head with extraordinary clearness (as I had once seen it engraved at the top of a pedlar's ballad) and took away my appetite for courts of justice.
Carpenter, when he's through with that buckle, tell him to forge a pair of steel shoulder-blades; there's a pedlar aboard with a crushing pack.