Pegasus


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Peg·a·sus

 (pĕg′ə-səs)
n.
1. Greek Mythology A winged horse that with a stroke of his hoof caused the fountain Hippocrene to spring forth from Mount Helicon.
2. A constellation in the Northern Hemisphere near Aquarius and Andromeda.

[Middle English, from Latin Pēgasus, from Greek Pēgasos.]
American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, Fifth Edition. Copyright © 2016 by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. All rights reserved.

Pegasus

(ˈpɛɡəsəs)
n
(Classical Myth & Legend) Greek myth an immortal winged horse, which sprang from the blood of the slain Medusa and enabled Bellerophon to achieve many great deeds as his rider

Pegasus

(ˈpɛɡəsəs)
n, Latin genitive Pegasi (ˈpɛɡəˌsaɪ)
(Celestial Objects) a constellation in the N hemisphere lying close to Andromeda and Pisces
Collins English Dictionary – Complete and Unabridged, 12th Edition 2014 © HarperCollins Publishers 1991, 1994, 1998, 2000, 2003, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2011, 2014

Peg•a•sus

(ˈpɛg ə səs)

n. gen. -si (-ˌsaɪ) for 2.
1. a winged horse of Greek myth.
2. the Winged Horse, a northern constellation between Cygnus and Aquarius.
Pe•ga•si•an (pəˈgeɪ si ən) adj.
Random House Kernerman Webster's College Dictionary, © 2010 K Dictionaries Ltd. Copyright 2005, 1997, 1991 by Random House, Inc. All rights reserved.

Peg·a·sus

(pĕg′ə-səs)
A constellation in the Northern Hemisphere near Aquarius and Andromeda.
The American Heritage® Student Science Dictionary, Second Edition. Copyright © 2014 by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. All rights reserved.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.Pegasus - (Greek mythology) the immortal winged horse that sprang from the blood of the slain MedusaPegasus - (Greek mythology) the immortal winged horse that sprang from the blood of the slain Medusa; was tamed by Bellerophon with the help of a bridle given him by Athena; as the flying horse of the Muses it is a symbol of highflying imagination
Greek mythology - the mythology of the ancient Greeks
2.Pegasus - a constellation in the northern hemisphere near Andromeda and Pisces
Based on WordNet 3.0, Farlex clipart collection. © 2003-2012 Princeton University, Farlex Inc.
Translations
Pegas
PegasusPegasos
Pegasus
PégaszoszPegazus
Pegasus

Pegasus

[ˈpegəsəs] NPegaso m
Collins Spanish Dictionary - Complete and Unabridged 8th Edition 2005 © William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1971, 1988 © HarperCollins Publishers 1992, 1993, 1996, 1997, 2000, 2003, 2005

Pegasus

nPegasus m
Collins German Dictionary – Complete and Unabridged 7th Edition 2005. © William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1980 © HarperCollins Publishers 1991, 1997, 1999, 2004, 2005, 2007

Pegasus

[ˈpɛgəsəs] n (Myth, Astron) → Pegaso
Collins Italian Dictionary 1st Edition © HarperCollins Publishers 1995
References in classic literature ?
THE name of the public-house was the Pegasus's Arms.
Framed and glazed upon the wall behind the dingy little bar, was another Pegasus - a theatrical one - with real gauze let in for his wings, golden stars stuck on all over him, and his ethereal harness made of red silk.
And when Perseus cut off her head, there sprang forth great Chrysaor and the horse Pegasus who is so called because he was born near the springs (pegae) of Ocean; and that other, because he held a golden blade (aor) in his hands.
Her did Pegasus and noble Bellerophon slay; but Echidna was subject in love to Orthus and brought forth the deadly Sphinx which destroyed the Cadmeans, and the Nemean lion, which Hera, the good wife of Zeus, brought up and made to haunt the hills of Nemea, a plague to men.
When John went into the stable he told James that master and mistress had chosen a good, sensible English name for me, that meant something; not like Marengo, or Pegasus, or Abdallah.
Yes, they WERE the same, exactly the same; so why should I have gone off riding on Pegasus' back?
'For my part, I wish I had Pegasus here at this moment,' said the student.
Helen Della Delmar (proclaimed with a flourish of trumpets and rolling of tomtoms to be the greatest woman poet in the United States) denied Brissenden a seat beside her on Pegasus and wrote voluminous letters to the public, proving that he was no poet.
"On no account will I allow it," said the curate; "your mightiness must remain on horseback, for it is on horseback you achieve the greatest deeds and adventures that have been beheld in our age; as for me, an unworthy priest, it will serve me well enough to mount on the haunches of one of the mules of these gentlefolk who accompany your worship, if they have no objection, and I will fancy I am mounted on the steed Pegasus, or on the zebra or charger that bore the famous Moor, Muzaraque, who to this day lies enchanted in the great hill of Zulema, a little distance from the great Complutum."
He had thought it very simple on the part of people who had, like herself, nothing else in prospect but Charmolue and Torterue, and who, unlike himself, did not gallop through the regions of imagination between the wings of Pegasus. From their remarks, he had learned that his wife of the broken crock had taken refuge in Notre-Dame, and he was very glad of it.
To careful reasoning of this kind he replies by calling himself Pegasus, and every form of prescribed work `harness.'"
Seeing no better way out of it, Veneering here pulls up his oratorical Pegasus extremely short, and plumps down, clean over his head, with: 'Lammle, God bless you!'