Peloponnesian War


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Peloponnesian War

n
(Historical Terms) a war fought for supremacy in Greece from 431 to 404 bc, in which Athens and her allies were defeated by the league centred on Sparta
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Noun1.Peloponnesian War - a war in which Athens and its allies were defeated by the league centered on Sparta; 431-404 BC
Aegospotami, Aegospotamos - a river in ancient Thrace (now Turkey); in the mouth of this river the Spartan fleet under Lysander destroyed the Athenian fleet in the final battle of the Peloponnesian War (404 BC)
References in periodicals archive ?
While some scholars have tended to downplay the continuities between naval operations in the present era and those of classical Greek and Roman times, Nash argues that the Greeks featured in Thucydides's famous history of the Peloponnesian War (late fifth century BCE) were quite conscious of such matters as the importance of command of the sea, control of SLOCs, and defense of trade and the role of fleets in diplomacy.
One recent book, by the Harvard political scientist Graham Allison, focuses on the so-called "Thucydides Trap," named for the ancient Greek historian who chronicled the competitive relationship that ultimately produced the Peloponnesian War between a rising Athens and Sparta, the superpower of its day.
Two years after it was written, Athens was struck a final blow by Sparta during the Peloponnesian war, and never regained its greatness.
A research paper for a Philosophy of History course that explored The Peloponnesian War and a Pan African Studies course that explored the various conflicts in West Africa sparked a sudden interest in Military History.
Some of the events described by Thucydides in The Peloponnesian War do not square with the inevitability thesis.
He cited the Thucydides trap, where Athenian fear of a rising Sparta made the Peloponnesian War inevitable.
Thucydides detailed the effects of messages dispatched during the Peloponnesian War, and 'narrative' is frequently cited today as an important part of the war against the Islamic State.
Sophocles, one of the greatest Greek tragedians, was himself a Greek general, and his plays written after he returned from the Peloponnesian War, like 'Ajax" and "Philoctetes," shed light on our own current homecomings.
In an episode in his History of the Peloponnesian War, Thucydides
Truth Thucydides made a note covering the Peloponnesian War.
Diplomats figured prominently in Thucydides's History of the Peloponnesian War, which recounts the epochal 27-year conflict between rival alliances led by Athens and Sparta (431-404 BCE).
As Harvard professor Joseph Nye noted back in 2005, the Peloponnesian War resulted from Sparta's fears of an economically powerful Athens, but conflict wasn't inevitable.