Comanche

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Co·man·che

 (kə-măn′chē)
n. pl. Comanche or Co·man·ches
1. A member of a Native American people formerly ranging over the southern Great Plains from western Kansas to northern Texas and now located in Oklahoma. The Comanche became nomadic buffalo hunters after migrating south from Wyoming in the 18th century.
2. The Uto-Aztecan language of the Comanche.

[Spanish, from Ute kı̷mmanči.]

Co·man′che adj.

Comanche

(kəˈmæntʃɪ)
npl -ches or -che
1. (Peoples) a member of a Native American people, formerly ranging from the River Platte to the Mexican border, now living in Oklahoma
2. (Languages) the language of this people, belonging to the Shoshonean subfamily of the Uto-Aztecan family

Co•man•che

(kəˈmæn tʃi, koʊ-)

n., pl. -ches, (esp. collectively) -che.
1. a member of a Plains Indian people ranging in the mid-19th century over a large area of the S Great Plains: later confined to a reservation in Oklahoma.
2. the Uto-Aztecan language of the Comanche, closely related to Shoshone.
[1800–10, Amer.]
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.Comanche - a member of the Shoshonean people who formerly lived between Wyoming and the Mexican border but are now chiefly in Oklahoma
Shoshone, Shoshoni - a member of the North American Indian people (related to the Aztecs) of the southwestern United States
2.Comanche - the Shoshonean language spoken by the Comanche
Shoshonean, Shoshonean language, Shoshonian, Shoshonian language - a subfamily of Uto-Aztecan languages spoken mainly in the southwestern United States
References in periodicals archive ?
The largest band was the Penateka, who resided in the south of Texas.
The Penateka Comanches experienced numerous casualties with the Anglo-Texans prior to the Civil War.