Pepys

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Pepys

 (pēps, pĕp′ĭs), Samuel 1633-1703.
English civil servant whose diary includes detailed descriptions of the Great Plague (1665) and the Great Fire of London (1666).

Pepys′i·an adj.
American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, Fifth Edition. Copyright © 2016 by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. All rights reserved.

Pepys

(piːps)
n
(Biography) Samuel. 1633–1703, English diarist and naval administrator. His diary, which covers the period 1660–69, is a vivid account of London life through such disasters as the Great Plague, the Fire of London, and the intrusion of the Dutch fleet up the Thames
Collins English Dictionary – Complete and Unabridged, 12th Edition 2014 © HarperCollins Publishers 1991, 1994, 1998, 2000, 2003, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2011, 2014

Pepys

(pips, pɛps, ˈpi pɪs, ˈpɛp ɪs)

n.
Samuel, 1633–1703, English diarist and naval official.
Random House Kernerman Webster's College Dictionary, © 2010 K Dictionaries Ltd. Copyright 2005, 1997, 1991 by Random House, Inc. All rights reserved.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.Pepys - English diarist whose diary contained detailed descriptions of 17th century disasters in England (1633-1703)Pepys - English diarist whose diary contained detailed descriptions of 17th century disasters in England (1633-1703)
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References in periodicals archive ?
In its turn, the Estoire probably served as a model for the much better known ME version, the so-called Pepysian Gospel Harmony dated to c.
Moreover, it offers a glimpse into a changing style of self-presentation in a period in which most of what was committed to writing was fairly restrained, and forty years before the Pepysian model asserts itself, changing forever our sense of what it was to compile a "diary."
His dictated account to Samuel Pepys in 1680 is in the Pepysian Library, Magdalene College, Cambridge (MSS 2141).
The editor, an expert in all matters Pepysian, has written a valuable 'general introduction' and the editorial matter is of the high standard one has come to expect from this scholar.
It is attributed to Marcellus Lauron ('Old Laroon', c 1650-1702, not his son Marcellus Laroon, 'Laroon the Younger', 1679-1772); see Robert Raines, 'Drawings by Marcellus Lauron-"Old Laroon"-in the Pepysian Library', Apollo (October 1965), Supplement, 2.
I wish to thank the following for their help in the research for this study: Annie Walker, assistant librarian at the Vaughan Williams Memorial Library, Cecil Sharp House, for her exhaustive searches of the literature for versions of the song; Roy Palmer for his extensive help with the difficult area of eighteenth century broadsides; Dr Kaye McAlpine for her translations of the two Scots songs; Pete Coe, Martin Graebe, Bruce Olsen, Ingrid Temple, the Pepysian Library, the University of Sheffield Library, and the Houghton Library, Harvard University for providing specific versions; Roy Clinging, Bob Copper, John Gall of Beamish Museum, Vic Gammon, and Steve Gardham for informative exchanges.