peregrine falcon

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peregrine falcon

n.
A swift-flying bird of prey (Falco peregrinus) having gray and white plumage. It is found worldwide and is much used in falconry. Also called duck hawk.

[Middle English, translation of Medieval Latin falcō peregrīnus (so called because they were caught in passage rather than taken from the nest as were eyas falcons).]
American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, Fifth Edition. Copyright © 2016 by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. All rights reserved.

peregrine falcon

n
(Animals) a falcon, Falco peregrinus, occurring in most parts of the world, having a dark plumage on the back and wings and lighter underparts. See also duck hawk
Collins English Dictionary – Complete and Unabridged, 12th Edition 2014 © HarperCollins Publishers 1991, 1994, 1998, 2000, 2003, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2011, 2014

per′egrine fal′con


n.
a cosmopolitan falcon, Falco peregrinus, that feeds on birds taken in flight.
[1350–1400]
Random House Kernerman Webster's College Dictionary, © 2010 K Dictionaries Ltd. Copyright 2005, 1997, 1991 by Random House, Inc. All rights reserved.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.peregrine falcon - a widely distributed falcon formerly used in falconryperegrine falcon - a widely distributed falcon formerly used in falconry
falcon - diurnal birds of prey having long pointed powerful wings adapted for swift flight
Falco, genus Falco - a genus of Falconidae
falcon-gentil, falcon-gentle - female falcon especially a female peregrine falcon
Based on WordNet 3.0, Farlex clipart collection. © 2003-2012 Princeton University, Farlex Inc.
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References in periodicals archive ?
In addition, there are the Red Book bar-headed goose, white-headed duck, the great black-headed gull, the balaban, the golden eagle, barbary falcon, peregrin falcon, white-tailed eagle in the protected natural areas of Kyrgyzstan.
I can cite case after case: the resurgence of the American alligator, the fact that the skies are once again graced by many bald eagles, and that the Peregrin falcon is moving from near extinction to the threshhold of de-listing, The opponents of the Endangered Species Act know these facts.