peremptory

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peremptory

arbitrary, dogmatic, domineering; imperative: a peremptory order; imperious or dictatorial; assertive: a peremptory manner
Not to be confused with:
preemptive – an action that is taken before an adversary can act: a preemptive strike
preemptory – occupation of land to establish a prior right to buy: preemptory claim; an act or statement that is absolute; it cannot be denied: a preemptory challenge
Abused, Confused, & Misused Words by Mary Embree Copyright © 2007, 2013 by Mary Embree

per·emp·to·ry

 (pə-rĕmp′tə-rē)
adj.
1.
a. Subject to no further debate or dispute; final and unassailable: a peremptory decree.
b. Not allowing contradiction or refusal; imperative: The officer issued peremptory commands.
2. Offensively self-assured; imperious or dictatorial: a swaggering, peremptory manner.

[Latin perēmptōrius, from perēmptus, past participle of perimere, to take away : per-, per- + emere, to obtain; see em- in Indo-European roots.]

per·emp′to·ri·ly adv.
per·emp′to·ri·ness n.
American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, Fifth Edition. Copyright © 2016 by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. All rights reserved.

peremptory

(pəˈrɛmptərɪ)
adj
1. urgent or commanding: a peremptory ring on the bell.
2. not able to be remitted or debated; decisive
3. positive or assured in speech, manner, etc; dogmatic
4. (Law) law
a. admitting of no denial or contradiction; precluding debate
b. obligatory rather than permissive
[C16: from Anglo-Norman peremptorie, from Latin peremptōrius decisive, from perimere to take away completely, from per- (intensive) + emere to take]
perˈemptorily adv
perˈemptoriness n
Collins English Dictionary – Complete and Unabridged, 12th Edition 2014 © HarperCollins Publishers 1991, 1994, 1998, 2000, 2003, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2011, 2014

per•emp•to•ry

(pəˈrɛmp tə ri)

adj.
1. leaving no opportunity for denial or refusal; imperative: a peremptory command.
2. imperious or dictatorial.
3. positive or assertive in speech, tone, manner, etc.
4. Law.
a. precluding or not admitting of debate or question: a peremptory edict.
b. decisive or final.
[1505–15; < Latin peremptōrius final, decisive, deadly (derivative of perimere to destroy) =per- per- + em-, base of emere to buy, orig. to take + -tōrius -tory1, with intrusive p]
per•emp′to•ri•ly, adv.
per•emp′to•ri•ness, n.
Random House Kernerman Webster's College Dictionary, © 2010 K Dictionaries Ltd. Copyright 2005, 1997, 1991 by Random House, Inc. All rights reserved.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Adj.1.peremptory - offensively self-assured or given to exercising usually unwarranted powerperemptory - offensively self-assured or given to exercising usually unwarranted power; "an autocratic person"; "autocratic behavior"; "a bossy way of ordering others around"; "a rather aggressive and dominating character"; "managed the employees in an aloof magisterial way"; "a swaggering peremptory manner"
domineering - tending to domineer
2.peremptory - not allowing contradiction or refusal; "spoke in peremptory tones"; "peremptory commands"
imperative - requiring attention or action; "as nuclear weapons proliferate, preventing war becomes imperative"; "requests that grew more and more imperative"
3.peremptory - putting an end to all debate or action; "a peremptory decree"
decisive - determining or having the power to determine an outcome; "cast the decisive vote"; "two factors had a decisive influence"
Based on WordNet 3.0, Farlex clipart collection. © 2003-2012 Princeton University, Farlex Inc.

peremptory

adjective
1. imperious, arbitrary, assertive, authoritative, autocratic, dictatorial, dogmatic, bossy (informal), intolerant, domineering, overbearing, high-handed He treated his colleagues in a peremptory manner.
2. incontrovertible, final, binding, commanding, absolute, compelling, decisive, imperative, obligatory, undeniable, categorical, irrefutable He had obtained a peremptory court order for his children's return.
Collins Thesaurus of the English Language – Complete and Unabridged 2nd Edition. 2002 © HarperCollins Publishers 1995, 2002

peremptory

adjective
The American Heritage® Roget's Thesaurus. Copyright © 2013, 2014 by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. All rights reserved.
Translations

peremptory

[pəˈremptərɪ] ADJ [tone] → perentorio, imperioso; [person] → imperioso, autoritario
Collins Spanish Dictionary - Complete and Unabridged 8th Edition 2005 © William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1971, 1988 © HarperCollins Publishers 1992, 1993, 1996, 1997, 2000, 2003, 2005

peremptory

[pəˈrɛmptəri] adjpéremptoire
Collins English/French Electronic Resource. © HarperCollins Publishers 2005

peremptory

adj command, instructionkategorisch; gesture, voicegebieterisch; personherrisch; peremptory challenge (US Jur) Ablehnung eines Geschworenen ohne Angabe von Gründen
Collins German Dictionary – Complete and Unabridged 7th Edition 2005. © William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1980 © HarperCollins Publishers 1991, 1997, 1999, 2004, 2005, 2007

peremptory

[pəˈrɛmptrɪ] adjperentorio/a
Collins Italian Dictionary 1st Edition © HarperCollins Publishers 1995
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