periglacial


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Related to periglacial: periglacial climate

periglacial

(ˌpɛrɪˈɡleɪʃəl)
adj
(Physical Geography) relating to a region bordering a glacier: periglacial climate.
Collins English Dictionary – Complete and Unabridged, 12th Edition 2014 © HarperCollins Publishers 1991, 1994, 1998, 2000, 2003, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2011, 2014
Translations

periglacial

[ˌpɛrɪˈgleɪʃəl] adjperiglaciale
Collins Italian Dictionary 1st Edition © HarperCollins Publishers 1995
References in periodicals archive ?
The authors associate the formation of the pavement with erosion phases involving the bottoms of periglacial dry valleys, which could have happened in the Bolling and Allerod (Majewski 2013; Paluszkiewicz 2016).
Haberlah (2007) posited that loess-generating environments can also be semi-arid, because the generation of silt-sized material and the sorting and subsequent spatial concentration is controlled by mechanisms and processes that operate in both periglacial and hot, semi-arid environments.
Phylogeography of the montane caddisfly Drusus discolor: evidence for multiple refugia and periglacial survival.
Kaverin et al., "High-resolution mapping of ecosystem carbon storage and potential effects of permafrost thaw in periglacial terrain, European Russian Arctic," Journal of Geophysical Research Biogeosciences, vol.
Qualitative reconstruction of the past climatic characteristics over long time scales is possible thanks to geomorphological and biological paleoclimatic indicators (e.g., typical features of glacial and periglacial environment, debris covered glaciers and rock glaciers, tree remnants under glacial deposits, and pollens) [19-22].
Cheng, "A review of the influence of freeze-thaw cycles on soil geotechnical properties," Permafrost and Periglacial Processes, vol.
Forts, Floods, and Periglacial Features: Exploring the Pittsburgh Low Plateau and Upper Youghiogheny Basin
Neuzil [33] identified two types of deformation: direct loading (or compaction) under the weight of the ice and flexural loading in subglacial and periglacial regions affected by glacioisostatic flexure of the lithosphere.
The features monitored in a number of sites include latelying snow beds (zabois), active travertine springs, debris flow channels, and stone rings and solifluction lobes characteristic of periglacial terrains (Brookes 1993).
More substantial accumulation of rocks is required by some other mammalian species, e.g., pikas (Ochotona spp.) in talus of western North America (MacDonald and Jones, 1987; Smith and Weston, 1990) and the mountain pygmy possum (Burramys parvus) in alpine periglacial boulder fields of southeastern Australia (Menkhorst et at, 2008).