peripatetic

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Related to Peripatetics: Peripateticism, Aristotelian

per·i·pa·tet·ic

 (pĕr′ə-pə-tĕt′ĭk)
adj.
1. Walking about or from place to place; traveling on foot.
2. Peripatetic Of or relating to the philosophy or teaching methods of Aristotle, who conducted discussions while walking about in the Lyceum of ancient Athens.
n.
1. One who walks from place to place; an itinerant.
2. Peripatetic A follower of the philosophy of Aristotle; an Aristotelian.

[Middle English peripatetik, from Latin peripatēticus, from Greek peripatētikos, from peripatein, to walk about, or from peripatos, covered walk (where Aristotle allegedly lectured) : peri-, peri- + patein, to walk; see pent- in Indo-European roots.]

peripatetic

(ˌpɛrɪpəˈtɛtɪk) or

peripatetical

adj
1. itinerant
2. (Education) Brit employed in two or more educational establishments and travelling from one to another: a peripatetic football coach.
n
a peripatetic person
[C16: from Latin peripatēticus, from Greek peripatētikos, from peripatein to pace to and fro]
ˌperipaˈtetically adv

Peripatetic

(ˌpɛrɪpəˈtɛtɪk)
adj
(Philosophy) of or relating to the teachings of Aristotle, who used to teach philosophy while walking about the Lyceum in ancient Athens
n
(Philosophy) a student of Aristotelianism

per•i•pa•tet•ic

(ˌpɛr ə pəˈtɛt ɪk)

adj.
1. walking or traveling about; itinerant.
2. (cap.) of or pertaining to Aristotle, who taught philosophy while walking in the Lyceum.
3. (cap.) of or pertaining to the Aristotelian school of philosophy.
n.
4. an itinerant person.
5. (cap.) a member of the Aristotelian school.
[1400–50; late Middle English < Latin peripatēticus < Greek peripatētikós of Aristotle and his school, literally, walking about =peripatē- (variant s. of peripateîn to walk about =peri- peri- + pateîn to walk) + -tikos -tic]
per`i•pa•tet′i•cal•ly, adv.
per`i•pa•tet′i•cism (-əˌsɪz əm) n.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.peripatetic - a person who walks from place to place
pedestrian, footer, walker - a person who travels by foot
2.peripatetic - a follower of Aristotle or an adherent of AristotelianismPeripatetic - a follower of Aristotle or an adherent of Aristotelianism
adherent, disciple - someone who believes and helps to spread the doctrine of another
Adj.1.peripatetic - of or relating to Aristotle or his philosophy; "Aristotelean logic"
2.peripatetic - traveling especially on foot; "peripatetic country preachers"; "a poor wayfaring stranger"
unsettled - not settled or established; "an unsettled lifestyle"

peripatetic

adjective travelling, wandering, roaming, migrant, mobile, roving, nomadic, itinerant, vagrant, vagabond, ambulant Her father was in the army and the family led a peripatetic existence.

peripatetic

adjective
Leading the life of a person without a fixed domicile; moving from place to place:
Translations

peripatetic

[ˌperɪpəˈtetɪk] ADJ [salesman] → ambulante; [teacher] → con trabajo en varios colegios (Philos) → peripatético
to lead a peripatetic existencecambiar mucho de domicilio, no tener residencia fija

peripatetic

[ˌpɛripəˈtɛtɪk] adj
(British) [teacher] → qui travaille dans plusieurs établissements
[salesman] → ambulant(e)

peripatetic

adjumherreisend; existencerastlos; teacheran mehreren Schulen unterrichtend attr

peripatetic

[ˌpɛrɪpəˈtɛtɪk] adj (salesman) → ambulante (Brit) (teacher) che insegna in varie scuole
References in classic literature ?
To sage Philosophy next lend thine ear, From heaven descended to the low-roofed house Of Socrates--see there his tenement-- Whom, well inspired, the Oracle pronounced Wisest of men; from whose mouth issued forth Mellifluous streams, that watered all the schools Of Academics old and new, with those Surnamed Peripatetics, and the sect Epicurean, and the Stoic severe.
The Peripatetics introduced the notion of potential intellect; but the origin of our difficulty was actual knowing and not knowing.
Time and the world are considered to be eternal in the Arabic Neoplatonic texts and in the works of the Baghdad Peripatetics, except, as we have seen, in the theological treatises of Ibn 'Adi.
The rhetorical question with which the quotation concludes ("Why in heaven's name was he perambulating ...?") reflects Aristotle's style of lecturing, after which his followers (the Peripatetics) (30) were named.
In the second, Barnes, Susanne Bozien, and Mario Mignucci examine the logical theories of the Peripatetics, the Megarics, and the Stoics.
(17.) One has only to remember Abelard's concealment of his lifelong protector, Etienne de Garlande, the mightiest man in the kingdom of France, although the peripatetics of the master can only be understood when brought into relation with the fluctuating fortunes of his protector.
The third pertains to the issue of continuity and discontinuity of physical bodies and the fourth is about the Peripatetics' denial of the possibility of the existence of another world completely different from the one we know.
Aldus added an apology to his first edition which departs from the early Quattrocento's prejudices against Lucretius in the neutrality of its position: Lucretius might be read, he wrote, "not because what he might have written is true or to be believed by us--since he dissents gready from the academics and peripatetics, not to mention our theologians--but because he committed the Epicurean dogma to verse with great learning and elegance." (84) Pio's approach is much less apologetic, and directly addresses the conspiracy of silence and Ciceronian slander which had grossly misrepresented Lucretius and the doctrines of Epicurus.
Des evenements se produisent, qui tiennent en haleine." Mainly, we hang on for dear life, as we follow the dizzy peripatetics of "notre homme." His greatest ambition, we learn, is to sculpt a tree from a tree; but he intends to eschew the vulgar hammers and chisels a sculptor normally works with, and to use only words to coax form out of form.
Podlecki, `The Peripatetics as Literary Critics', Phoenix 23 (1969), 114-37.
This conception comes dangerously close to regarding tragedy as a form of morality play, and it is not surprising that she goes to the later Peripatetics and to the Neoplatonists for confirmation.
Only if natural substances are intelligible in terms of their proper physical causes, Albert realized, is a revival and extension of those programs of empirical investigation initiated by the early Peripatetics possible.