peripheral neuropathy

(redirected from Peripheral sensory neuropathy)
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peripheral neuropathy

n.
Neuropathy resulting from damage to the peripheral nervous system and characterized by symptoms such as numbness, burning, muscle weakness, and organ dysfunction. Peripheral neuropathy can be caused by physical trauma, a systemic disorder such as diabetes mellitus or peripheral vascular disease, or an autoimmune disorder.
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The most common adverse events of any grade include: anemia, peripheral sensory neuropathy, nausea, diarrhea, fatigue and neutropenia.
19] Since peripheral sensory neuropathy is a pivotal element in the causal pathway to both foot ulceration and amputation, selecting a quick, inexpensive, and accurate instrument to evaluate the high-risk patient is essential to make decisions.
The most common adverse events of any grade occurring in more than 30 percent of patients in this phase 1 trial were peripheral sensory neuropathy, diarrhea, fatigue and hair loss.
Peripheral sensory neuropathy associated with short-term oral acitretin therapy.
The diagnostic tool, the peripheral sensory neuropathy test, scans the foot to look for major skin breaches and, using "pressure mapping", detects the loss of sensation associated with ulceration.
The diagnostic tool - the peripheral sensory neuropathy test - scans the foot to look for major skin breaches and, using what's called pressure mapping, detects the loss of sensation associated with ulceration.
At some point, she developed peripheral sensory neuropathy in her hands and feet.
No correlation was found between peripheral sensory neuropathy and hearing loss.
In the integrated analysis, the most commonly reported adverse events were asthenic conditions (including fatigue, malaise, and weakness) (64%), nausea (55%), diarrhea (52%), constipation (41%), peripheral neuropathy NEC (including peripheral sensory neuropathy and peripheral neuropathy aggravated) (39%), thrombocytopenia and appetite decreased (including anorexia) (each 36%), pyrexia (34%), vomiting (33%), and anemia (29%).
CHICAGO -- Lipid-lowering therapy was associated with a significant reduction in the risk of developing peripheral sensory neuropathy in a large Australian observational study of adults with type 2 diabetes mellitus.
He appeared to have a peripheral sensory neuropathy that primarily affected his lower limbs, with some decrease in proprioception.

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